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Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg announced Wednesday in a 3,000-word note that Facebook plans to rebuild its services around several privacy-focused principles: "private interactions," "encryption," "reducing permanence," "safety," "interoperability" and "secure data storage."

The big picture: Zuckerberg’s note reflects how Facebook finds itself perpetually on the defensive over privacy issues. The social giant’s reputation has spiraled since last year, when reporters exposed the Cambridge Analytica scandal and Facebook was hit with its first major data breach, according to a Harris Poll survey produced in partnership with Axios.

  • Zuckerberg also said that Facebook is working to make messages interoperable between WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook, as Axios has reported previously.
"I believe the future of communication will increasingly shift to private, encrypted services where people can be confident what they say to each other stays secure and their messages and content won't stick around forever. This is the future I hope we will help bring about.
We plan to build this the way we've developed WhatsApp: focus on the most fundamental and private use case -- messaging -- make it as secure as possible, and then build more ways for people to interact on top of that, including calls, video chats, groups, stories, businesses, payments, commerce, and ultimately a platform for many other kinds of private services."

Go deeper: Privacy concerns push people to private, group-based platforms

Go deeper

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
1 hour ago - Health

Who benefits from Biden's move to reopen ACA enrollment

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Nearly 15 million Americans who are currently uninsured are eligible for coverage on the Affordable Care Act marketplaces, and more than half of them would qualify for subsidies, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation brief.

Why it matters: President Biden is expected to announce today that he'll be reopening the marketplaces for a special enrollment period from Feb. 15 to May 15, but getting a significant number of people to sign up for coverage will likely require targeted outreach.

2 hours ago - Technology

Big Tech bolts politics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Big Tech fed politics. Then it bled politics. Now it wants to be dead to politics. 

Why it matters: The social platforms that profited massively on politics and free speech suddenly want a way out — or at least a way to hide until the heat cools. 

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

GameStop as a metaphor

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A half-forgotten and unprofitable videogame retailer is, bizarrely and incredibly, on the lips of the nation. That's because the GameStop story touches on economic and cultural forces that affect everyone, whether they own a single share of stock or not.

Why it matters: In most Wall Street fights, the broader public doesn't have a rooting interest. This one — where a group of small traders won a multi-billion-dollar bet against giant hedge funds by buying stock in GameStop — is different.