Mark Zuckerberg told "Axios on HBO" that he believes Apple has "unilateral control of what gets on phones, in terms of apps," when asked if he believes that the product-driven company is a monopoly.

What he's saying: "I think it's probably about 50% of Americans who have smart phones, and a lot more people around the world. I think there are more than a billion Apple devices," Zuckerberg said in an interview with Axios' Mike Allen.

  • "So, I do think that there are questions that people should be looking into about that control of the App store and whether that is enabling as robust of a competitive dynamic."

Of note: Zuckerberg did not specify if the government should investigate, saying: "I think I'm not necessarily the person to answer that. ... I think some of the behavior certainly raises questions. And I do think it's something that deserves scrutiny."

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Ina Fried, author of Login
Oct 13, 2020 - Technology

Apple's events aren't what they used to be

Photo: Apple

Apple will introduce its latest iPhones today using the same format it has employed for more than a decade: a dedicated press event with executives touting how much better the new product is than all the ones that came before it.

Reality check: Apple events aren't nearly as exciting as they used to be. That's especially true since they've gone virtual during the pandemic. But a number of other factors also keep today's hourlong commercials from being as compelling as they used to be.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Ex-FDA chief: Pence campaigning after COVID exposure puts others at risk — Mark Meadows: "We are not going to control the pandemic"— COVID-19 looms over White House Halloween celebrations.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week — Fauci says maybe we should mandate masks if people don't wear themU.S. reports over 80,000 new cases for second consecutive day.
  3. World: Italy tightens restrictions Spain declares new state of emergency.

Amy Coney Barrett's immediate impact

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

In her first week on the job, Amy Coney Barrett may be deciding which votes to count in the presidential election. By her third week, she’ll be deciding the fate of the Affordable Care Act.

Where it stands: The Senate votes on Barrett’s nomination tomorrow. If she’s confirmed, Chief Justice John Roberts is expected to swear her in at the Supreme Court within hours, an administration official tells Axios.