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Shane Savitsky May 8, 2017
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Marine Le Pen's brand of populism is far from dead

Claude Paris / AP

With Emmanuel Macron's resounding victory in yesterday's French presidential election, it's easy to craft a narrative trumpeting the resilience of the grand European experiment and the death of European populism. But to do so would ignore a fundamental truth: Marine Le Pen might have lost, but her performance — capturing more than a third of the French electorate — was another step toward the normalization of far-right politics across both the continent and the West at large.

Here to stay: University of Georgia professor Cas Mudde, who has authored a number of works on populism and extremism in Europe, told Axios that the far right's well-established place in French politics, having played a part for the last 40 years, means Macron's presidency will only affect the National Front in the short-term:

"Macron is just a phase. If he does well, the slow but steady rise of the National Front will be stopped, for a while. If he does badly, it will increase a bit sharper."