Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) would oppose any move to expand the number of justices on the Supreme Court if Democrats win back the Senate and White House in the election, he told Jake Tapper on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday.

Driving the news: Democrats have floated adding more justices to the court as retaliation for Republicans rushing through a new justice for President Trump weeks before the 2020 election, after stalling President Obama's final nominee nine months before the 2016 election.

What he's saying: Manchin said he would not support the move because it's not in line with the Senate's reputation and history as the "most deliberate body."

  • "I'm not going to vote for anything that would cause, basically, not to be able to work in a bipartisan way," Manchin said. "That is not something that I would support."
  • Manchin is one of the more conservative Democratic senators and comes from a state that Donald Trump easily won in 2016.

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Republicans and Dems react to Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation

President Trump stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett after she took the constitutional oath to serve as a Supreme Court justice during a White House ceremony Monday night .Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Trump said Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Senate confirmation to the Supreme Court and her subsequent taking of the constitutional oath Monday was a "momentous day," as she she vowed to serve "without any fear or favour."

Of note: As Republicans applauded the action, Democratic leaders warned of consequences to the rush to replace the late liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg with a conservative so close to the election, as progressives led calls to expand the court.

Schumer: Coney Barrett vote "one of the darkest days" in Senate history

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Monday "will go down as one of the darkest days" in Senate history, moments before the chamber voted 52-48 to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

The bottom line: Schumer said his Republican colleagues "decided to thwart the will of the people" by holding the vote eight days ahead of the presidential election, despite opposing President Obama's nominee because it was an election year.

Supreme Court rejects request to extend Wisconsin absentee ballot deadline

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court in a 5-3 decision Monday rejected an effort by Wisconsin Democrats and civil rights groups to extend the state's deadline for counting absentee ballots to six days after Election Day, as long as they were postmarked by Nov. 3.

Why it matters: All ballots must now be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in Wisconsin, a critical swing state in the presidential election.