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MacArthur and Meadows working on ACA stabilization package

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Reps. Tom MacArthur and Mark Meadows are working together on an individual market stabilization package, according to a senior GOP aide. It will include funding for the Affordable Care Act's cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers, although it's unclear for how long. While the duo has ideas for the rest of the package, they're open to input — especially from the Senate, where they're actively courting support.

The catch: One crucial piece, according to a second GOP aide, is an agreement on "very flexible 1332 waiver language" in exchange for CSR funding. The state waivers are an important priority for conservative Republicans. Discussions are currently only among Republicans, but could include Democrats in the future.

The goals of the package are to reduce premiums, stabilize the marketplaces and offer some kind of tax relief. They've had some discussions with individual senators, including one of the three Republicans who voted against the "skinny repeal" package (the aide declined to say which one). Serious discussions started sometime last week, after MacArthur approached Meadows about working together.

Context: Meadows and MacArthur — a former co-chair of the moderate Tuesday Group — worked together on a waiver provision in the House ACA replacement bill that ultimately got it across the finish line. Since the ACA repeal effort failed in the Senate, Meadows has adamantly suggested that the fight to repeal the law isn't over, but this new effort suggests the Freedom Caucus chairman realizes the stakes of ignoring the individual market in the meantime.

Mike Allen 44 mins ago
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Why Trump added a streetfighter to his legal team

Screenshot via Fox News

A new addition to President Trump's legal team — Joe diGenova, a former U.S. attorney who is well-known in Washington and has argued for the president on Fox News — reflects three White House realities.

The state of play: (1) The White House is digging in for a fight that looks to be longer and messier than officials had expected. (2) This is another example of the president responding to televised cues. Trump has spent most of his adult life in litigation, and obsesses about legal positioning in the same way that he is consumed by his press coverage. (3) It's another pugilistic voice at the table, and suggests that this weekend's attacks on Mueller won't be the last.

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Facebook reaches a tipping point

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios 

Of all the news crises Facebook has faced during the past year, the Cambridge Analytica scandal is playing out to be the worst and most damaging.

Why it matters: It's not that the reports reveal anything particularly new about how Facebook's back end works — developers have understood the vulnerabilities of Facebook's interface for years. But stakeholders crucial to the company's success — as well as the public seem less willing to listen to its side of the story this time around.