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Luxury brands win right to stop sales on Amazon in Europe

Covergirl makeup is displayed in a shopping aisle
Photo: Elise Amendola / AP

The European Court of Justice ruled Wednesday that luxury brands have the right to prevent retailers from selling their products on third-party marketplaces like if the restriction is motivated by the desire to preserve the brand's exclusive image.

Why it matters: Brands have chafed at their inability under U.S. law to prevent retailers, who sometimes acquire products without the brands' consent, from reselling that merchandise through online marketplaces.

"The quality of luxury goods is not simply the result of their material characteristics, but also of the allure and prestigious image which bestows on them an aura of luxury," the decision reads, further arguing that restricting where luxury goods are resold isn't anticompetitive, but necessary to protect the integrity of the product.

The ruling resulted from a suit in which U.S.-based Coty, which manufacturers luxury cosmetics brands like like Marc Jacobs and Chloe as well as more mainstream brands like Covergirl, argued that German retailer Parfümerie Akzente was violating the terms of its contract by reselling its brands on

Amy Harder 12 hours ago
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Climate change goes to business school(s)

Beautiful long entrance to Duke University, with the chapel at the end
Duke University Chapel. Photo: Lance King/Getty Images

More than a dozen business schools and some of Wall Street’s biggest firms are converging for the next two days at Duke University to discuss the business effects of climate change.

Why it matters: This conference is being billed as the first to bring together students from a range of business schools to address the issue. That reflects both how climate change is becoming more of a tangible business concern and that younger people care more about it than older generations.

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The U.S. suburbs are hot again

The talk around the world is about the rise of the city. But in the U.S., suburbanization is accelerating, according to new Census data released today.

Data: Census Bureau, analysis by Jed Kolko at Indeed.com; Chart: Axios Visuals

What's happening: Since about 2011, the growth of the urban counties of large cities has been sliding. Population growth in their higher-density suburbs has been falling since 2015 as well. But, as you see in the chart above, lower-density suburbs had the highest growth among all places, and exurbs and small towns have also been on the rise, according to an analysis of the data by Jed Kolko, chief economist at Indeed.