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Expand chart
Data: St. Louis Federal Reserve; Chart: Axios Visuals

Perhaps more important than sustained demand, the mortgage financing landscape now is "very different from 2006," Danielle Hale, chief economist for Realtor.com tells Axios.

By the numbers: She cites metrics like the Mortgage Bankers Association's mortgage credit availability index, which found credit supply at its lowest level since March 2014 in August, and well below where it stood in 2006, at "over 800."

  • "Regulatory and legislative changes made after the last recession ensure that mortgages are more strictly underwritten and lower appetite for risk means lenders have tightened lending criteria compared to last year."
  • Similar metrics like the Urban League's housing credit availability index also show much lower risk being taken by lenders.

But, but, but: There is a downside. Tightening credit requirements also mean that many potential homeowners could be locked out of the market.

  • A June report from the Urban League prepared for the New York Fed noted that while the housing market seems strong, "Beneath the surface, credit has tightened. When credit availability becomes an issue, minority borrowers tend to be disproportionately affected."

Go deeper: Why the real estate boom could keep going for years

Go deeper

American dream deferred

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Lambert Studios (ARC), H. Armstrong Roberts (ClassicStock)/Getty Images

The U.S. government partnered with the private sector for decades to prevent Black Americans and immigrants from owning homes, and while explicit rules regulating where people of color live were outlawed in 1968, the legacy of racial segregation in undervalued neighborhoods still reverberates throughout the country.

Why it matters: Owning a home is an integral piece of the American dream, and the single most important driver of wealth generation and financial security — especially for Black households.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.

Bush labels Clyburn the “savior” for Democrats

House Majority Whip James Clyburn takes a selfie Wednesday with former President George W. Bush. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush credited Rep. James Clyburn with being the "savior" of the Democratic Party, telling the South Carolinian at Wednesday's inauguration his endorsement allowed Joe Biden to win the party's presidential nomination.

Why it matters: The nation's last two-term Republican president also said Clyburn's nod allowed for the transfer of power, because he felt only Biden had the ability to unseat President Trump.