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Louis C.K. Photo: Chris Pizzello / AP

The premiere of Louis C. K.'s film "I Love You, Daddy" at the Paris Theatre has been cancelled ahead of the publication of a New York Times story about the comedian, in case of damaging allegations, the Hollywood Reporter reports. C.K. also cancelled his appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, originally scheduled for Friday.

Why it matters: There have been several Hollywood stars accused of sexual harassment and assault over the past few weeks, including Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey, leading to intense speculation about what the Times' story will contain.

There was already controversy surrounding the film, which centers on a TV writer and producer attempting to stop his teenage daughter from falling in love with a 68-year-old filmmaker, mirroring Woody Allen's film "Manhattan," according to the Hollywood Reporter.

C.K. defended the film to the Hollywood Reporter, saying: "We're depicting oxygen-rich people who live in these beautiful apartments and offices saying whatever they want. Folks say shit to each other. You can't think about the audience when you're making the thing. If you do, you're not giving them something that came out of your gut. You'll be making something that you're like, 'Is this O.K. for you?'"

Go deeper

20 mins ago - Podcasts

Bob Nelsen on AstraZeneca and his plan to revolutionize biotech

AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford on Monday reported promising efficacy data for their COVID-19 vaccine, which has less stringent storage requirements than the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines and may be distributed earlier in developing countries.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the state of vaccine and therapeutics manufacturing with Bob Nelsen, a successful biotech investor who on Monday launched Resilience, a giant new pharma production platform that he believes will prepare America for its next major health challenges.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Updated 26 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Unpacking Joe Biden's decision to tap John Kerry as his climate envoy

Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is naming former Secretary of State John Kerry as a special presidential envoy for climate change.

Why it matters: The transition team's announcement sought to show that it will be an influential role, noting that Kerry — a former Massachusetts senator and the Democrats' 2004 presidential nominee — will be on the National Security Council.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Oxford and AstraZeneca's vaccine won't just go to rich countries

Waiting, in New Delhi. Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

While the 95% efficacy rates for the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines are great news for the U.S. and Europe, Monday's announcement from Oxford and AstraZeneca may be far more significant for the rest of the world.

Why it matters: Oxford and AstraZeneca plan to distribute their vaccine at cost (around $3-4 per dose), and have already committed to providing over 1 billion doses to the developing world. The price tags are higher for the Pfizer ($20) and Moderna ($32-37) vaccines.