Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Locust nymphs aggregated on the ground at a hatch site near Isiolo town in Isiolo county, eastern Kenya. Photo: Tony Karumba/AFP via Getty Images

A second and stronger wave of locusts is expected to threaten parts of Africa in late June and July, just months after the start of the biggest outbreak some countries had seen in roughly 70 years, AP reports.

Why it matters: The crisis has been compounded by restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic, which has hindered the movement of personnel and equipment, the U.N. says. The expected surge is estimated to be about 20 times the size of the first.

The plague, at least partially attributed to climate change, will present an "unprecedented threat to food security and livelihoods for millions," the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization notes.

  • Six East African countries are anticipated to be most affected or at risk for the pests: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda and Tanzania. Some 20 million people in those nations are already experiencing acute food insecurity.
  • Already, the swarms have been seen in Djibouti, Eritrea and Congo.
  • Yemen, which was also affected by the first swell of locusts, presently has 15 million people experiencing acute food insecurity.

The big picture: Billions of young desert locusts are emerging from breeding grounds in Somalia to find fresh vegetation that coincidences with seasonal rains, AP writes.

The U.N. raised its appeal for aid from $76 million to $153 million, saying the new outbreak "could lead to further suffering, displacement and potential tensions." So far, contributors have given or pledged $111.1 million.

  • It has treated more than 240,000 hectares across 10 countries with chemical pesticides or biopesticides, with 750 people on the ground trained to control the outbreak.

Go deeper

58 mins ago - World

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai detained on fraud charge

An activist holds a placard highlighting China's Tiananmen Square massacre as pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrives at West Kowloon Magistrates' Court in Hong Kong in November. Photo: Isaac Wong/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai is being detained until an April court hearing after the pro-democracy supporter was charged Thursday with fraud, per his Apple Daily news outlet.

Why it matters: The 72-year-old's arrest and denial of bail is another blow for the pro-democracy movement in the former British colony amid concerns about a fresh crackdown on activists.

5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Inhofe loudly sets Trump straight on defense bill

Sen. Jim Inhofe speaks with reporters in the Capitol last month. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senator Jim Inhofe told President Trump today he'll likely fail to get two big wishes in pending defense spending legislation, bellowing into his cellphone: "This is the only chance to get our bill passed," a source who overheard part of their conversation tells Axios.

Why it matters: Republicans are ready to test whether Trump's threats of vetoing the bill, which has passed every year for more than half a century, are empty.

Conspiracy theories blow back on Trump's White House

Sidney Powell. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

President Trump has rarely met a conspiracy theory he doesn't like, but he and other Republicans now worry the wild tales told by lawyers Sidney Powell and Lin Wood may cost them in Georgia's Senate special elections.

Why it matters: The two are telling Georgians not to vote for Republicans David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler because of a bizarre, baseless and potentially self-defeating theory: It's not worth voting because the Chinese Communist Party has rigged the voting machines.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!