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Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) told "Axios on HBO" that she won't support Democrats in their fight against the GOP's push for more restrictive voting laws — a sign that she'll be no hero to the resistance.

Why it matters: Ten days after losing her House Republican post, Cheney is trying to put former President Trump's Big Lie about the election in a silo. She doesn't accept the larger context: Republicans spent years fertilizing the soil for voters to believe that voter fraud is rampant.

Speaking to "Axios on HBO" on Friday in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Cheney disputed any linkage between Trump’s false claims about 2020 and the current flurry of GOP efforts at the state level to pass new restrictions.

  • "I will never understand the resistance, for example, to voter ID," she said. "There's a big difference between that and a president of the United States who loses an election after he tried to steal the election and refuses to concede."

But she said Trump supporters' refusal to accept President Biden's victory "is really dangerous."

  • "I think about 2000," she said. "I think about sitting on the inaugural platform in January of 2001 watching Al Gore. ... I'm sure he didn't think he had lost. We had fought this politically very, very intense battle. And he conceded. He did the right thing for this nation."
  • "And that is one of the big differences between that and what we're dealing with now and the danger of Donald Trump today."

Go deeper

Judge sanctions Sidney Powell and other Trump campaign lawyers over failed lawsuit

Attorney Sidney Powell speaking during a news conference in Washington, D.C, in November 2020. Photo: Sarah Silbiger for the Washington Post via Getty Images

A federal judge on Wednesday sanctioned attorneys — including Sidney Powell, an ex-campaign lawyer for former President Trump who spread baseless conspiracy theories — over an unsuccessful lawsuit that attempted to overturn Michigan’s 2020 election results.

Why it matters: U.S. District Judge Linda Parker formally requested a disciplinary body to investigate whether Powell and the other pro-Trump lawyers, including Lin Wood, should be disbarred for filing the lawsuit, which she said "abused the well-established rules applicable to the litigation process by proffering claims not backed by law."

House passes $768 billion defense spending bill

Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The House approved a $768 billion National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for the 2022 fiscal year in a bipartisan 316-113 vote on Thursday.

Why it matters: The annual bill, which authorizes Pentagon spending levels and guides policy for the department, would require women to register for the military draft, among other provisions.

6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Republicans’ secret lobbying

Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios

The five Senate Republicans who helped negotiate and draft the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill have been privately courting their Republican colleagues to pass the measure in the House.

Why it matters: House GOP leaders are actively urging their members to oppose the bill. The senators are working to undercut that effort as Monday shapes up as a do-or-die moment for the bipartisan bill.