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A driver fills up a UPS truck with liquid natural gas. Photo: J. Emilio Flores/Corbis via Getty Images

Not long after putting the news of Shell's big new Canadian LNG project to bed, Axios received a Wood Mackenzie note taking stock of the action with analyst Dulles Wang writing that after several quiet years, "We believe 2019 could be the busiest year of LNG [final investment decisions] ever. It seems that mega-projects are back."

Why it matters: The expected flurry of action reflects an important dynamic — China's energy needs are booming while it's trying to move away from coal in order to address terrible air pollution. The Canadian project joins others, like the proposed Alaska LNG project, planning to serve Asian demand more broadly.

The momentum behind LNG Canada reflects the drastic improvement in the LNG market over the past 12 months, driven by buoyant demand in China. A clutch of projects are vying for FID, including four mega trains in Qatar, Arctic LNG-2 in Russia, at least one development in Mozambique and several US projects.
— Dulles Wang

The big picture: A Reuters story yesterday looks more deeply at the global market.

  • Their piece cites different estimates of how much global LNG demand will grow, which range from 360 million metric tons per annum (mtpa) to as much as 450 million mtpa in 2023. (Per Shell, it was 293 million mtpa last year).
  • Reuters also quotes a Bernstein research note stating:
There needs to be 200 mtpa LNG capacity authorized by 2025 to meet future demand — this is a colossal boom, a 42 percent expansion on the entire capacity installed since 1962.

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Technology

Twitter sues Texas AG Ken Paxton

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton at February's Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Twitter on Monday filed a lawsuit against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R), saying that his office launched an investigation into the social media giant because it banned former President Trump from its platform.

Driving the news: Twitter is seeking to halt an investigation launched by Paxton into moderation practices by Big Tech firms including Twitter for what he called "the seemingly coordinated de-platforming of the President," days after they banned him following the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Senate retirements could attract GOP troublemakers

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.). Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. Roy Blunt's retirement highlights the twin challenge facing Senate Republicans: finding good replacement candidates and avoiding a pathway for potential troublemakers to join their ranks.

Why it matters: While the midterm elections are supposed to be a boon to the party out of power, the recent run of retirements — which may not be over — is upending that assumption for the GOP in 2022.

Congressional diversity growing - slowly

Data: Brookings Institution and Pew Research Center; Note: No data on Native Americans in Congress before the 107th Congress; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

The number of non-white senators and House members in the 535-seat Congress has been growing steadily in the past several decades — but representation largely lags behind the overall U.S. population.

Why it matters: Non-whites find it harder to break into the power system because of structural barriers such as the need to quit a job to campaign full time for office, as Axios reported in its latest Hard Truths Deep Dive.