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Mary Altaffer, Chuck Burton / AP

The structure of our brains may explain why liberals and conservatives react to emotional political appeals — like Jimmy Kimmel's viral health care push — in different ways. Psychiatrist Gail Saltz found that if you look at the size of brain structures, you can predict someone's ideology at at a "frequency of 71.6 percent."

Liberals tend to have a larger and more active anterior cingulate gyrus.

What that means: This part of the brain is responsible for conflict detection, as well as taking in new information and understanding its impact while making decisions. This could make liberals more likely to approach issues with heightened sensitivity.

Conservatives often have a larger and more active amygdala.

What that means: This is responsible for fear processing information and activating the fight-or-flight response. It is expected that someone with this feature will be influenced by fear when making decisions. Psychologists have also found that conservatives prefer stability and structure.

The differences can be exemplified in the contrasting themes from Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's rhetoric on the campaign trail.

On the Orlando nightclub shooter:

Clinton: "A madman filled with hate, with guns in his hands, and just a horrible sense of vengeance and vindictiveness in his heart, apparently consumed by rage against LGBT Americans, and by extension, the openness and diversity that defines our American way of life...."

Trump: "A radical Islamic terrorist targeted the nightclub, not only because he wanted to kill Americans, but in order to execute gay and lesbian citizens, because of their sexual orientation."

Responses to a question on job creation at the first general election debate:

Clinton: "The central question in this election is really what kind of country we want to be and what kind of future we'll build together. Today is my granddaughter's second birthday, so I think about this a lot..."

Trump: "Our jobs are fleeing the country. They're going to Mexico. They're going to many other countries. You look at what China is doing to our country in terms of making our product. They're devaluing their currency, and there's nobody in our government to fight them..."

Opening remarks after acknowledging the crowds at their first campaign speeches:

Clinton: "You know, President Roosevelt's Four Freedoms are a testament to our nation's unmatched aspirations and a reminder of our unfinished work at home and abroad."

Trump: "Our country is in serious trouble. We don't have victories anymore. We used to have victories, but we don't have them."

Go deeper

Scoop: Trump talked out of early Ohio endorsement

Jane Timken at a 2017 Trump rally. Photo: Kyle Mazza/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Donald Trump had to be talked out of making an early endorsement in Ohio's 2022 U.S. Senate race, a sign of his eagerness to reengage politically, people familiar with the conversations tell Axios.

What we're hearing: The former president discussed endorsing former state GOP chair Jane Timken last week during a meeting at Mar-a-Lago with RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel, but top advisers — including Donald Trump Jr. — urged him to wait.

Scoop: Parscale launches super PAC

Brad Parscale. Photo: Tom Brenner/Getty Images

Former Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale has founded a new super PAC and sister advocacy group, public records show.

Why it matters: The groups will allow Parscale himself to back candidates aligned with Donald Trump ahead of the 2022 midterms. They could also be used to deploy his new political data firm and harvest vital voter information for other clients.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Health: Trump received COVID vaccine at White House in January — CDC director warns "now is not the time" to lift COVID restrictions.
  2. Education: More schools are reopening in the U.S.
  3. Vaccine: J&J CEO "absolutely" confident in vaccine distribution goals Most states aren't prioritizing prisons for COVID vaccines — Vaccine hesitancy is shrinking.
  4. Economy: Apple says all U.S. stores open for the first time since start of pandemic — What's really going on with the labor market.
  5. Sports: Poll weighs impact of athlete vaccination.
  6. World: Latin America turns to China and Russia for COVID-19 vaccines.