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Photo: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Special Counsel Robert Mueller's indictment against 13 Russian cybercriminals shows that not only was social media the primary tactic used by Russian informants to meddle in the U.S. election, but that they were incredibly savvy about the way they used it, setting up IT, data and payment departments around their manipulation efforts.

Our thought bubble: The indictment will likely put more pressure on lawmakers and social media companies to find a path toward more oversight of bad actors using social media to manipulate Americans and meddle in elections. Expect more moves like Facebook's doubling of its security staff from other companies.

  • The indictment corroborates most of what has already been reported, which is that bad actors associated with the Russian troll farm called the Internet Research Agency set up fake accounts, bought ads and communicated with real U.S. people to meddle in the election using social media.
  • What's new is that the indictment affirms that the group launched in 2013 and that efforts to meddle in the election date as far back as 2014. It also states a budget of "millions" of U.S. dollars associated with the criminals' efforts and details how sophisticated their operation was.

Here are the big social media takeaways from the indictment:

  1. The indicted individuals were linked to the Russian troll farm called the Internet Research Agency, which employed roughly 100 people to manage social media manipulation of the US 2016 election beginning in 2014.
  2. They had an annual budget of roughly "millions of U.S. dollars."
  3. More than 80 individuals were assigned to a "translator project" to focus on social media manipulation efforts.
  4. The use of social media was extremely sophisticated, with bad actors setting up graphics, IT and finance departments.
  5. The Russian criminals and their co-conspirators traveled, or attempted to travel, to the United States under false pretenses in other to collect intelligence for their interference operations.
  6. They used U.S. VPNs and sophisticated technologies to delete their tracks, such data and emails linking them to nefarious behaviors.
  7. They had a stated goal of “spread(ing) distrust towards the candidates and the political system in general.”
  8. They started contacting real U.S. citizens through fake accounts by at least June 2016.
  9. They used fake or stolen U.S. personas to set up PayPal accounts and conduct financial fraud to finance their efforts.
  10. Even after the election, criminals were still using these tactics to host fake support rallies for President-elect Trump.

Go deeper

100+ corporate executives consider freezing donations over laws curbing voting access

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

More than 100 corporate executives and leaders gathered on a zoom call Saturday to discuss ways to combat controversial voting bills that would restrict voting access that are being considered across the country, per the Washington Post.

Why it matters: American corporations flexed their advocacy muscles earlier this month when more than 100 companies signaled their opposition to Georgia's new voting law, inciting the wrath of GOP leaders, including former President Donald Trump and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

7 hours ago - World

Defense Sec. Austin stresses U.S. commitment to Israel's security amid growing Iran tensions

Issei Kato/Reuters/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin arrived for his first visit in Jerusalem amid nuclear talks in Vienna and growing tensions between Israel and Iran.

Why it matters: Austin met his counterpart Benny Gantz and will meet later with Prime Minister Netanyahu to discuss Iran and regional security issues.

"I was horrified": Leaders respond to footage of Black and Latino Army officer threatened at traffic stop

An Army officer is suing two Virginia police officers after he said they drew their guns and pepper-sprayed him during a traffic stop in December.

Why it matters: Footage of the incident has drawn widespread criticism from leaders and groups in the state. Caron Nazario, who is Black and Latino, is heard saying “I’m honestly afraid to get out," to which a police officer responds “Yeah, you should be," in a video from a body-worn camera.