Feb 7, 2020 - Politics & Policy

All top law school journals are led by women for the first time in history

Grace Paras (left) was the editor in chief of the Georgetown Law Journal and Toni Deane (right) is the first African American to lead the publication. Photo: Astrid Riecken/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The editors in chief of law journals at the top 16 law schools in the U.S. are women for the first time in history, the Washington Post reports.

The state of play: At an event honoring the 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote that brought all of the editors together, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, "It's such a contrast to the ancient days when I was in law school. There really is no better time for women to enter the legal profession."

  • A woman was not elected to lead the law journal at Harvard Law School, Ginsburg's alma mater, until 20 years after she first arrived on campus.
  • The slate of female editors celebrated their historical accomplishment by putting together a Women & Law Journal that contains essays from female lawyers.

Worth noting, via the Post: Women still only make up less than a quarter of law firm equity partners, a quarter of tenured and tenure-track law professors and about a third of active federal district and appeals court judges.

  • And only four women have ever served on the Supreme Court.

Go deeper

International Women's Day and the glass ceiling

Data: Rutgers Center for American Women and Politics; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Women running for national and state office may be on track to break the record-setting runs and gains of 2018, as Republicans try to catch up with their Democratic counterparts.

Yes, but: The Super Tuesday results, and Elizabeth Warren's withdrawal, effectively ended any chance that this will be the year a woman wins the presidency. On International Women's Day this weekend, it's worth remembering that the struggle to reach the White House masks a lot of real progress at lower levels.

California's "woman quota" law seems to be working

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

When California passed its boardroom law requiring public companies based there to have at least one female director, there were concerns it would spark a gold rush for the same handful of well-known women — but that hasn’t happened.

Why it matters: Of the 138 women who joined all-male California boards last year, 62% are serving on their first company board, per a study by accounting firm KPMG. That means a majority of companies aren't contributing to so-called overboarding in corporate America.

China's domestic violence epidemic

A former domestic abuser who now volunteers to help others stop their abusive behavior. Photo: Felix Wong/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

Chinese activists say domestic violence cases have risen dramatically as people across much of the country have been quarantined during the coronavirus outbreak.

Why it matters: As International Women's Day approaches this year, China is reneging on its constitutional commitment to gender equality.

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