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Expand chart
Data: Miller et al., Cancer statistics for the US Hispanic/Latino population, 2021; Chart: Will Chase/Axios

U.S. Latinos are more likely to suffer from potentially preventable cancers than non-Hispanic whites, according to a report released Tuesday.

Why it matters: The report underlines how a lack of health care for Latinos blocks early detection of preventable cancers, such as stomach, liver and cervical cancer. It was published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

  • The report's authors noted in a press release that "the high burden of these cancers in this population could be reduced by increasing access to high-quality prevention, early detection, and treatment services."

The big picture: Latinos as a group have the highest percentage of people without health insurance than any other ethnicity in the U.S., the report found.

  • Between 2017 and 2018, 26% of Latinos were uninsured, compared to 9% of non-Hispanic whites.
  • "Since 2019, job losses and decreases in income resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, which have disproportionately affected people of color, may have contributed to disruptions in health coverage," the Kaiser Family Foundation writes.

Between the lines: Cancer continues to be the leading cause of death among Latinos, followed by heart disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

  • Overall, however, Latinos in the U.S. have lower cancer-incident and mortality rates than non-Hispanic whites.

What they're saying: "Addressing this critical gap for Hispanic individuals in obtaining access to high-quality cancer prevention, early detection and treatment are going to be essential for mitigating the predicted growth in the cancer burden," said Kimberly Miller, a scientist at the American Cancer Society and lead researcher on the report.

By the numbers: One in 42 Latino men will develop liver cancer, compared to 1 in 85 non-Hispanic whites, and while 1 in 64 Latinos will develop stomach cancer compared to 1 in 122 non-Hispanic whites, the report notes. Latinos are also around twice as likely to die from these cancers.

  • Latinas are more than twice as likely to develop liver cancer(1 in 81 compared to 1 in 200 for non-Hispanic white women) or stomach cancer (1 in 89 for Latinas, compared to 1 in 210 for non-Hispanic white women). They are also twice as likely to die from those illnesses.
  • Latinas are 32% more likely than non-Hispanic white women to get cervical cancer (1 in 115 compared to 1 in 180), which is almost entirely preventable through screening and vaccination. In Puerto Rico, Latinas' incidence of cervical cancer is 78% higher than non-Hispanic white women.
  • The report says that between 2009 and 2018 overall cancer incidence rates declined by about 2% per year among Latino men and remained stable among Latinas, but they "have begun to increase in more recent years."

What we're watching: The report estimates that there will be 176,600 new cancer cases and 46,500 cancer deaths in 2021 among Latino communities in the U.S.

  • This is an increase from 2018, when the American Cancer Society predicted 42,700 deaths and 149,100 new cases.

Go deeper:

Get more news that matters about Latinos in the hemisphere, delivered right to your inbox on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Sign up for the Axios Latino newsletter.

Go deeper

Latinos are more exposed to and likely to share misinformation

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Websites and apps more popular with Latinos in the U.S. than other groups make them more susceptible both to exposure to misinformation and to sharing it, according to a Nielsen report.

What’s happening: 28% of the content Latinos see on news websites they most frequently visit was flagged as biased, conspiracy-based or pseudoscientific.

Updated 12 mins ago - World

Reports: Up to 17 U.S. missionaries kidnapped in Haiti

Haitian soldiers guard the public prosecutor's office in Port-au-Prince earlier this month. Photo: Richard Pierrin/AFP via Getty Images

Children were among up to 17 American Christian missionaries and their relatives kidnapped by a gang in Haiti on Saturday, the New York Times first reported.

Details: The missionaries had just left an orphanage and were traveling by bus to the airport to "drop off some members" and were due to travel to another destination when the gang struck in Port-au-Prince, Haitian security officials said, per the NYT.

2 hours ago - World

Melbourne, "world's most locked-down city," to lift stay-at-home orders

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews during a news conference in Melbourne, Australia, on Sunday. Photo: Quinn Rooney/Getty Images

Melbourne's stay-at-home orders will end five days earlier than planned, officials in Australia's second-biggest city announced Sunday.

Why it matters: The capital of the state of Victoria has had six lockdowns totaling 262 days since March last year. That means Melbourne spent longer under lockdown than "any other city in the world" during the pandemic, Reuters notes.