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A rally in rally in Brooklyn, N.Y., protesting Latino segregation in October 2015. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

U.S. Latinos have a higher life expectancy and earn more yearly income when they live in racially mixed neighborhoods compared to areas that are predominantly Black or Latino, an analysis finds.

Why it matters: The study by the University of California Berkeley’s Othering and Belonging Institute released this week shows the physical and economic toll on Latinos as cities become more segregated.

By the numbers: Latino children raised in integrated neighborhoods earn $844 more per year as adults than Latino children raised in highly segregated communities of color, the report found from analyzing data from 1990 to 2019.

  • They earn $5,000 more as an adult annually when raised in predominantly white neighborhoods than those raised in highly segregated communities of color.
  • "Segregation remains one of the principal causes of group-based inequality, by separating people from life-enhancing resources, such as good schools, healthy environments, and access to jobs," the report concludes.
  • The nation’s largest cities and metropolitan areas remain highly segregated, but the mid-Atlantic, the Midwest, and the West Coast — places where Latinos live — disproportionately make up the most segregated regions.

The intrigue: "The Roots of Structural Racism: Twenty-First Century Racial Residential Segregation in the United States" found that the segregation of Latinos skyrocketed in both small and large metro regions since 1990.

Expand chart
Data: Othering and Belonging Institute report; Chart: Axios Visuals

Between the line: A report from The Civil Rights Project at UCLA in December found that school segregation between Black and white students has returned to 1968 levels, even as the nation grows more diverse.

Yes, but: The resegregation of U.S. schools often doesn't produce all-Black enrollment as the declining contact with whites has been replaced by growing contact with Latinos, an issue that has received little research.

  • This has created majority-Black-Latino school systems with small white student populations like Boston Public Schools and Aldine Independent School District in Houston.

Racial segregation also was linked to disparities in life outcomes in some places. Highly segregated white neighborhoods had a life expectancy of 81 years compared to 77 years in highly segregated areas where Latinos live.

  • Life expectancy is more than five years greater in San Francisco white neighborhoods (84 years) than in segregated Black/Latino enclaves (79 years).

Don't forget: Feeling stigmatized, threatened, or discriminated against correlates with structural heart abnormalities in Latinos, according to a preliminary study by the American Medical Association.

  • The study measured the left ventricle and atrial health of over 1,800 Latinos—including Hispanics born outside the U.S. or who predominantly speak Spanish—living in the Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego.
  • People with an enlarged left atrium or ventricle usually suffer from conditions like high blood pressure and are more prone to have strokes.

Go deeper

Austin lives longer

Expand chart
Data: University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Kids born today in Central Texas will live longer than most of their fellow Texans, per an Axios analysis of life expectancy data.

  • Travis, Hays and Williamson counties rank in the top 10 of Texas’ 254 counties for average life expectancy, according to 2021 data from the University of Wisconsin's Population Health Center.
7 mins ago - Sports

Gonzaga University revokes NBA great John Stockton's tickets over mask stance

Former Utah Jazz player John Stockton during a 2017 press conference in Salt Lake City, Utah. Photo: Melissa Majchrzak/NBAE via Getty Images

Gonzaga University suspend the season tickets of notable alumni John Stockton after the NBA Hall of Famer failed to comply with the school's basketball games mask mandate, the Spokesman-Review first reported.

Driving the news: "Basically, it came down to, they were asking me to wear a mask to the games and being a public figure, someone a little bit more visible, I stuck out in the crowd a little bit," the former Utah Jazz point guard told the outlet in an interview Saturday.

Updated 2 hours ago - World

State Department orders evacuation of U.S. diplomats' families from Ukraine

From left, Under Secretary for Political Affairs Victoria Nuland, Secretary of State Antony Blinken and U.S. Chargés d'Affaires in Ukraine Kristina Kvien during a meeting with Prime Minister of Ukraine Denys Shmyhal in Kyiv. Photo: Yevhen Liubimov/ Ukrinform/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

The State Department will begin evacuating families and non-essential staff from the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv this week, according to a travel advisory published Sunday evening.

Why it matters: The move underscores U.S. fears that a Russian invasion could destabilize Ukraine and threaten embassy's ability to assist Americans.