Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Lamar Alexander has officially thrown in the towel on a bipartisan bill to stabilize the ACA. He said in a letter to allies that "Democrats are not willing even to make modest temporary changes with which they agree. So now efforts to help Americans paying skyrocketing premiums will turn to the Trump Administration and the states."

Between the lines: Alexander praised the administration's proposal to expand access to association health plans — policies that allow similarly situated people to band together basically as if they were under the umbrella of one large employer.

But he was less gung-ho about the other half of the administration's current efforts, which would expand access to short-term insurance plans that often provide a relatively skimpy set of benefits.

  • Alexander's letter mentions proposed rules "that would reaffirm the role of states in regulating short term health insurance," which could provide an alternative for people who can't afford ACA coverage.
  • The Trump administration is expanding access to short-term plans. States cannot expand it further. Their role is, primarily, to either limit the length of time people can have this coverage, or force it to cover more.

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Updated 38 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 11,662,574 — Total deaths: 539,058 — Total recoveries — 6,336,732Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 2,948,397 — Total deaths: 130,430 — Total recoveries: 924,148 — Total tested: 36,032,329Map.
  3. States: Arizona reports record 117 deaths in 24 hours.
  4. Public health: Trump administration invests $2 billion in coronavirus drugs.
  5. Business: Breaking down the PPP disclosure debacle
  6. World: Brazil's President Bolsonaro tests positive for coronavirus — India reports third-highest coronavirus case count in the world.

Mary Trump book: How she leaked Trump financials to NYT

Simon & Schuster

In her new memoir, President Trump's niece reveals how she leaked hordes of confidential Trump family financial documents to the New York Times in an effort to expose her uncle, whom she portrays as a dangerous sociopath.

Why it matters: Trump was furious when he found out recently that Mary Trump, a trained psychologist, would be publishing a tell-all memoir. And Trump's younger brother, Robert, tried and failed to block the publication of "Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man."

2 hours ago - World

Brazil's Bolsonaro tests positive for coronavirus

Photo: Andre Borges/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro announced Tuesday that he tested positive for coronavirus.

Why it matters: Brazil's coronavirus outbreak is one of the largest in the world, topped only by the U.S., and Bolsonaro has long downplayed the effects of the virus, pushing businesses to reopen over the last few months in order to jumpstart the country's economy.