Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

State officials said Thursday that TC Energy's Keystone Pipeline System leaked an estimated 383,000 gallons of crude oil in North Dakota, according to the Associated Press.

Why it matters: The Keystone Pipeline — which can carry 23 million gallons of tar sands oil every day from Canada to oil terminals in Illinois — and its proposed "XL" expansion project have been the target of environmental protests for years.

Details: The leak occurred in a drainage area near the town of Edinburg in northeast North Dakota, less than 50 miles from the Canadian border, according to the New York Times.

  • The leak affected 22,500 square feet of land, including some wetlands. State authorities said the leak has been contained and that no sources of drinking water were contaminated.
  • The company and regulators told AP that the cause of the leak is being investigated.

The big picture: Per Axios' Amy Harder, pipelines are a far safer way to transport oil than other ways (like trains), but nonetheless risks exist. Environmentalists, looking to oppose oil and gas in any way possible, seize on pipeline spills as evidence the industry isn't safe.

  • Between the lines: This particular pipeline is part of a larger system of pipelines that includes the Keystone XL project, much of which has been stuck in a permitting, political and legal morass for more than a decade.

Go deeper: Keystone XL pipeline approved in Nebraska, but more legal challenges await

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Kudlow says he regrets claiming Trump couldn't use executive order for unemployment

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that he regrets suggesting this week that unemployment benefits can only be extended by Congress.

Why it matters: President Trump's decision to bypass Congress to sign four executive actions, including one that provides $400 per week in extra unemployment benefits, has prompted outcry from Democrats and even some Republicans who believe he is overstepping his constitutional authority.

1 hour ago - World

Lebanon information minister resigns days after deadly explosion

Anti-government protesters in Beirut. Photo: STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Lebanon’s information minister resigned on Sunday in the wake of mass protests over the deadly blast in Beirut's port last week, which has killed at least 160 people and injured nearly 6,000, AP reports.

Why it matters: In her resignation letter, Manal Abdel-Samad called change "elusive" and apologized for not delivering more to the country, which had been devastated by a financial crisis and the coronavirus pandemic even before the blast destroyed much of the capital city.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 19,655,445 — Total deaths: 727,353 — Total recoveries — 11,950,845Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 4,998,802 — Total deaths: 162,425 — Total recoveries: 1,643,118 — Total tests: 61,080,587Map.
  3. Politics: Trump signs 4 executive actions on coronavirus aid — Democrats, and some Republicans, criticize the move.
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective — 1 in 3 Americans would decline COVID-19 vaccine.
  5. Science: Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline.
  6. Schools: How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on — Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Howard to hold fall classes online.