Sen. Kamala Harris. Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images

Democratic 2020 presidential candidate Kamala Harris, a junior senator from California, declared her support for legalizing marijuana at the federal level Monday on the syndicated radio show "The Breakfast Club."

Why it matters: In detailing her advocacy, Harris, who admitted in the interview that she had smoked a joint "a long time ago," joins a growing field of Democrats who back marijuana legalization.

  • Last May, Harris championed the Marijuana Justice Act introduced by Sen. Cory Booker, another 2020 Democratic presidential candidate.
  • Harris' comments follow those of Booker's, who kicked off his campaign earlier this month, calling for legalizing marijuana as a critical component of criminal justice reform.
  • Marijuana is presently legal in 10 states, while 33 states have legalized the substance for medicinal use and several additional states are considering legalization in 2019.

Go deeper: Kamala Harris officially launches 2020 bid

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Data: Money.net; Chart: Axios Visuals

The S&P 500 nearly closed at an all-time high on Wednesday and remains poised to go from peak to trough to peak in less than half a year.

By the numbers: Since hitting its low on March 23, the S&P has risen about 50%, with more than 40 of its members doubling, according to Bloomberg. The $12 trillion dollars of share value that vanished in late March has almost completely returned.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

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