Sep 5, 2018

Justice Department to examine social media censorship claims

The headquarters of the Department of Justice. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has planned a meeting this month with several state attorneys general to discuss whether social media companies may be "hurting competition and intentionally stifling the free exchange of ideas on their platforms," the Justice Department said in a statement.

Why it matters: Out of the many ways policymakers can address concerns with large tech companies, antitrust enforcement offers some of the toughest potential penalties. The announcement comes after President Trump, who is not supposed to influence the Justice Department's antitrust enforcement, called the social platforms biased.

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Updated 51 mins ago - Politics & Policy

CNN crew arrested live on air while reporting on Minneapolis protests

CNN's Omar Jimenez and his crew were arrested Friday by Minneapolis state police while reporting on the protests that followed the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in the city.

What happened: CNN anchors said Jimenez and his crew were arrested for not moving after being told to by police, though the live footage prior to their arrests clearly shows Jimenez talking calmly with police and offering to move wherever necessary.

First look: Trump courts Asian American vote amid coronavirus

Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

The president's re-election campaign debuts its "Asian Americans for Trump" initiative in a virtual event tonight, courting a slice of the nation's electorate that has experienced a surge in racism and harassment since the pandemic began.

The big question: How receptive will Asian American voters be in this moment? Trump has faced intense criticism for labeling COVID-19 the "Chinese virus" and the "Wuhan virus" and for appearing to compare Chinatowns in American cities to China itself.

How the U.S. might distribute a coronavirus vaccine

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Now that there are glimmers of hope for a coronavirus vaccine, governments, NGOs and others are hashing out plans for how vaccines could be distributed once they are available — and deciding who will get them first.

Why it matters: Potential game-changer vaccines will be sought after by everyone from global powers to local providers. After securing supplies, part of America's plan is to tap into its military know-how to distribute those COVID-19 vaccines.