Nov 18, 2019

New York City ride-hailing upstart Juno shuts down

Photo: Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

Juno, an upstart ride-hailing company in New York City, is shutting down as part of a new partnership between parent company Gett and Lyft. Gett's corporate customers will now be able to book rides via Lyft in the U.S., and some Belarus-based employees are joining Lyft, the latter tells Axios.

Why it matters: When Juno burst onto the scene in 2016, ride-hailing drivers were attracted to its promise of a better job, including potentially providing company equity someday. But that promise unraveled when Juno sold to Gett the following year and admitted there was no legal way to do so.

Editor's note: The story has been updated with details about Gett employees joining Lyft.

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20 women sue Lyft over sexual assault allegations

A car with Uber and Lyft stickers in March 2019 in San Francisco, California. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Twenty women have joined a California lawsuit accusing Lyft of failing to take action on a "sexual predator crisis" that the company has allegedly known about for four years, the Washington Post reports.

The big picture: Lyft and Uber have both come under fire over allegations of drivers harming their passengers. CNN found in 2018 that 31 drivers for Uber had been "convicted for crimes ranging from forcible touching and false imprisonment to rape."

Go deeperArrowDec 5, 2019

Lyft pulls scooters out of six major cities

Photo: Ronen Tivony/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Lyft is removing its electric scooters out of San Antonio, Dallas, Atlanta, Phoenix, Columbus and Nashville, as the company explained it will shift resources to markets where it "can have the biggest impact," CNET reports.

The big picture: The dockless, rentable, electric scooter trend started with just a couple companies operating in a handful of cities. "Now it's a competitive land grab, with more than a dozen operators that've dropped scooters in hundreds of cities around the world," CNET writes.

Go deeperArrowNov 16, 2019

Uber's first ever safety report cites 6,000 sex assaults in 2 years

Photo: ALASTAIR PIKE/AFP via Getty Images

In a long-awaited safety report, Uber disclosed on Thursday that during 2017 and 2018, U.S. users reported nearly 6,000 incidents of sexual assault of various kinds.

Why it matters: Uber (along with rival Lyft) has been criticized over the years not only for the occurrence of sexual assault and violence on rides, but also for its handling of these incidents, including attempts at downplaying or hiding them.

Go deeperArrowDec 6, 2019