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Photo illustration: Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

A U.S. district judge has dismissed New Mexico's privacy lawsuit against Google, saying the tech giant adequately meets federal guidance on complying with the Children's Online Privacy Act.

Why it matters: As a federal antitrust case looms, Google has also been fighting off legal challenges in various U.S. states as well as across the Atlantic. This victory means there's one less investigation to deal with for now.

Context: In February, New Mexico attorney general Hector Balderas accused Google in a lawsuit of illegally amassing schoolchildren's personal data through G Suite Education products that the tech giant lets kids use for free.

  • Eighty million teachers and students around the globe use G Suite education products.
  • Balderas alleged that Google collected kids' geolocation information, contact lists, browsing history and voice recordings on Google and YouTube without parental consent.

What they're saying: Judge Nancy Freudenthal wrote that Google appears to be meeting the Federal Trade Commission's standards under COPPA, including by letting schools stand in for parents to authorize the collection of kids' data.

  • “We are pleased with the ruling. We are committed to partnering with schools to protect students' privacy," said Jose Castaneda, a Google spokesperson.
  • "The law is clear that Google must protect our children’s privacy, and we strongly disagree with the Court’s ruling and will continue to litigate to protect child privacy rights," Balderas said in a statement.

Read the full order:

Go deeper

Alphabet workers announce a union

Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images

A group of more than 200 employees at Google's parent company announced on Monday that they've signed union cards with the Communications Workers of America, forming the Alphabet Workers Union.

Why it matters: This is the largest and most high-profile unionization effort among tech workers to date. The tech industry has historically eschewed unions, unlike other sectors like the auto industry.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.