Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

John Bolton during a meeting with Belarus' president Alexander in September. Photo: Yuri Oreshkin\TASS via Getty Images

Key Senate Republicans are refusing to give a clear answer on whether President Trump’s former national security adviser John Bolton should be subpoenaed to testify in an eventual impeachment trial, after he stated Monday that he would comply with a Senate subpoena.

Why it matters: Bolton has firsthand knowledge of Trump's direct conversations about Ukraine aid. The big question heading into this week is whether rebel Republican Senators are even remotely thinking about joining Democrats’ demands for the Senate to call witnesses and request documents from key figures being blocked by the White House.

  • These GOP senators either are facing tough re-election fights, have previously bucked Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), or are retiring and may feel less pressure to stick to the party line.

The bottom line: The senators made clear Monday that they will not commit to voting for witness testimony, despite new revelations over the holiday break about Trump's actions toward Ukraine.

What they're saying:

  • Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine): "I believe the Senate should follow the precedent that was established in the trial of President Clinton. ... I remember [now-Senate Minority Leader] Chuck Schumer voting against witnesses."
  • Asked if she personally wants to hear from Bolton: “I think we will decide at that stage who we need.”
  • Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), via spokesperson Karina Borger: “Senator Murkowski is taking this process one step at a time. Right now the articles of impeachment haven’t been transmitted to the Senate, so we aren’t to the step yet that you’ve referenced below. "
  • Senator Thom Tillis (R-N.C.): “I think it's more appropriate for the House to consider that task. And if Ambassador Bolton is prepared to testify, and they want to do it in the House ... I'm fine with that. What I don't want to do is all of a sudden open it up to where we effectively have an impeachment inquiry on the Senate side.”
  • Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa): "We don't even have articles of impeachment so why does it matter? ... Tell [House Speaker] Nancy Pelosi to get her act together.”
  • Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) was the most forthright about wanting to hear from Bolton, but he stopped short of committing to vote to subpoena him.

Bonus: House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), who was spotted in the Senate basement Monday afternoon, refused to state whether the House will subpoena Bolton for testimony, instead placing the emphasis on the Senate:

  • “Senators aught to hear directly from him, as well as the other witnesses. ... He was also a copious notetaker. It would help to start with the notes," Schiff said.
  • Asked whether Bolton would also comply with a House subpoena, Bolton's spokesperson Sarah Tinsley told Axios that he had "no further comment."

The backdrop: Pelosi has not yet decided when she will transmit the articles of impeachment to the Senate, and McConnell and Schumer have not yet agreed to the rules for a Senate trial.

  • McConnell said Monday that he thinks the Senate should adhere to the "precedent" from former President Bill Clinton's 1999 impeachment trial, and has previously stated his desire to pass two resolutions once in possession of the articles.
  • The first would establish the rules. The second would be voted on after senators give their opening statements and questions, and would determine whether any witnesses will be called.
  • Meanwhile Schumer has advocated for one resolution at the start of the trial that would address both the rules and which witnesses will be called.
  • If no deal is reached between the two leaders, 51 senators will vote to establish the process.

Go deeper: Trump aides fear John Bolton's secret notes

Go deeper

Indianapolis mass shooting suspect legally bought 2 guns, police say

Marion County Forensic Services vehicles are parked at the site of a mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Friday. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

The suspected gunman in this week's mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis legally purchased two assault rifles believed to have been used in the attack, police said late Saturday.

Of note: The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department's statement that Brandon Scott Hole, 19, bought the rifles last July and September comes a day after the FBI said in a statement to news outlets that a "shotgun was seized" from the suspect in March 2020 after his mother raised concerns about his mental health.

U.S. and China agree to take joint climate action

US Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry waves as he arrives at the Elysee Presidential Palace on March 10, 2021 in Paris. Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

Despite an increasingly tense relationship, the U.S. and China agreed Saturday to work together to tackle global climate change, including by "raising ambition" for emissions cuts during the 2020s — a key goal of the Biden administration.

Why it matters: The joint communique released Saturday evening commits the world's two largest emitters of greenhouse gases to work together to keep the most ambitious temperature target contained in the Paris Climate Agreement viable by potentially taking additional emissions cuts prior to 2030.

Biden defends not immediately raising refugee cap

President Biden speaking with reporters after leaving his cart following his first round of golf as president at Wilmington Country Club in Wilmington, Delaware, on Saturday. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden on Saturday sought to explain why he didn't immediately lift the Trump administration's historically low refugee cap.

Driving the news: Several Democrats accused Biden Friday of not fulfilling his pledge to raise the limit after it was announced he'd keep the cap. The White House said later it would be raised by May 15. Biden told reporters Saturday, "We're going to increase the number."