Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden responded to the string of violent protests consuming the U.S. following the police killing of George Floyd, calling for protesters to stop the violence.

What he's saying: "Protesting such brutality is right and necessary. It’s an utterly American response. But burning down communities and needless destruction is not. Violence that endangers lives is not."

  • "Violence that guts and shutters businesses that serve the community is not. The act of protesting should never be allowed to overshadow the reason we protest. It should not drive people away from the just cause that protest is meant to advance."
  • "As President, I will help lead this conversation — and more importantly, I will listen. I will keep the commitment I made to George’s brother, Philonise, that George will not just be a hashtag. We must and will get to a place where everyone, regardless of race, believes that "to protect and serve" means to protect and serve them."

Biden previously compared Floyd's death to Eric Garner's, a black man who died during an arrest after an officer used an illegal chokehold.

  • "Watching his life be taken in the same manner, echoing nearly the same words as Eric Garner more than five years ago — “I can’t breathe” — is a tragic reminder that this was not an isolated incident, but part of an ingrained systemic cycle that exists in this country," Biden said.

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Portland marks 100 days of protests

A protester holds a Black Lives Matter sign during a march to the Police Union building in Portland, Oregon, on Friday. Photo: Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters in Portland, Oregon, are marking 100 days of demonstrations against police brutality and systemic racism with a series of events this holiday weekend amid a backdrop of unrest.

The big picture: Demonstrators are holding vigils and speeches, while supporters of President Trump plan another caravan rally, AP notes. Police declared an unlawful assembly and arrested 27 people over Friday night, but there were peaceful scenes Saturday as protesters held sit-ins, played music and "stenciled the names of 39 Black people" killed by police or racially motivated violence, the Oregonian reports. The protests began over the May death of George Floyd.

Trump signs bill to prevent government shutdown

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel and President Trump arrives at the U.S. Capitol in March. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

President Trump signed a bill to extend current levels of government funding into the new fiscal year, White House spokesperson Judd Deere confirmed early Thursday.

Driving the news: The Senate on Tuesday passed the legislation to fund the federal government through Dec. 11, by a vote of 84-10.

Editor's note: This is a developing news story. Please check back for updates.

Updated 23 mins ago - Science

In photos: Deadly wildfires devastate California's wine country

The Shady Fire ravages a home as it approaches Santa Rosa in Napa County, California, on Sept. 28. The blaze is part of the massive Glass Fire Complex, which has razed over 51,620 acres at 2% containment. Photo: Samuel Corum/Agence France-Presse/AFP via Getty Images

More than 1700 firefighters are battling 26 major blazes across California, including in the heart of the wine country, where one mega-blaze claimed the lives of three people and forced thousands of others to evacuate this week.

The big picture: More than 8,100 wildfires have burned across a record 39 million-plus acres, killing 29 people and razing almost 7,900 structures in California this year, per Cal Fire. Just like the deadly blazes of 2017, the wine country has become a wildfires epicenter. Gov. Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency in Napa, Sonoma, and Shasta counties.