Oct 10, 2019

U.S. job openings and hiring both slowed in August

Data: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. job market remains strong, with more job openings than unemployed people seeking a job, but companies are starting to put some hiring plans on hold.

The big picture: The U.S. had 7.05 million job openings at the end of August, the Labor Department reported on Wednesday, but after torrid increases over the past 2 years, the number of jobs businesses have to offer is beginning to turn lower, but not because firms are filling the positions.

  • The Labor Department's job openings and labor turnover survey, or JOLTs, showed the number of job openings was 4.4% lower than it was a year earlier, falling for the third straight month.
  • The total number of workers hired to new jobs also was lower in August than in the same month in 2018.

Go deeper: U.S. jobs are key issue as GM strike drags on

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October jobs report surprises with 128,000 jobs added

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. economy added 128,000 jobs in October — more than the 75,000 economists expected — while the unemployment rate ticked higher to 3.6%, the government said on Friday.

Why it matters: The strong numbers come despite job growth held down by the 40-day United Auto Workers strike against General Motors, which has since ended.

Go deeperArrowNov 1, 2019

An uncertain future for "jobs of the future"

Data: Cognizant; Chart: Axios Visuals

Despite recession worries, demand for workers in the U.S. has climbed ever higher — and with it, the outlook for a bundle of jobs that could dominate future economies.

Why it matters: The fate of this seemingly future-proof work, much of it centered on interactions with increasingly intelligent machines, has looked rosy since 2016, but it's not clear how it would weather an economic downturn.

Go deeperArrowOct 26, 2019

U.S. employment index falls despite solid jobs report

Data: The Conference Board; Table: Axios Visuals

Despite a stronger-than-expected jobs report on Friday, the Conference Board's Employment Trends Index, which follows every U.S. payrolls report, decreased in October, with negative contributions from seven of its eight components.

Why it matters: “The index suggests that job growth may slow down a little in the coming months,” said Gad Levanon, head of The Conference Board Labor Market Institute.

Go deeperArrowNov 5, 2019