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Photo: Kevin Dietsch, Pool/Getty Images

Think of the job that you dreamed you could have when you grew up. Think of going through your whole life — and in an extraordinary twist of fate and luck and with a smart move — and, finally, that job will be the capstone to your career. Then, when you start that job, your boss spends the entire time making it hell for you.

The big picture: Jeff Sessions prides himself on being an honorable person. He takes extraordinary pride in the fact that, during his decades-long career, he's built a reputation as the literal and figurative Boy Scout. He loves that reputation — and doing the right thing. Now, he's being publicly humiliated day after day with his boss, President Trump, saying he did the wrong thing for the country by recusing himself from the Department of Justice's Russia investigation.

  • After withdrawing his resignation letter last year, Sessions resolved to push ahead, put his head down and fulfill the policy agenda he dreamed of enacting. But there’s an open question of how much more of this Sessions can take.
  • It’s nuts that he’s lasted this long. Imagine if this was happening to Jim Mattis. No one else would’ve put up with this and continued in the job with the commander-in-chief publicly saying he wishes he didn’t hire you and expressing no confidence in you.
  • Yes, but: Sessions eagerly pushed for the job, and he's yet to quit. 

There’s a chance this becomes the dog who caught the car. If Trump gets what he wants, it may be a disaster for him. Should Sessions resign, Trump won't easily get another person confirmed — and he’s got Rod Rosenstein as the deputy attorney general.

  • Trump has taken Sessions' decision so personally he can’t look at the situation objectively. So many people close to the president have tried to talk him around on Sessions, but nothing gets through.
  • They’ve tried all sorts of arguments, including pointing out that, because Sessions did everything by the book, it'll be the ultimate vindication when Mueller ultimately comes back with nothing. But nothing works. Trump’s mind on Sessions is set and can't be changed.

Go deeper: The brief history of how Trump turned on Sessions.

Editor's note: We changed the first sentence of the second paragraph to show it's a reflection on how Sessions views himself.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
27 mins ago - World

Global press freedom deteriorates amid pandemic

Data: Reporters Without Borders; Chart: Axios Visuals

Journalism is seriously restricted in 132 of 180 countries included in Reporters without Borders' annual Press Freedom Index — a particularly dangerous state of affairs during the pandemic.

Breaking it down: Nordic countries are ranked high on the list for having "good" press freedoms, while China, Turkmenistan, North Korea and Eritrea are at the bottom. The U.S. is ranked 44th.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

How anti-greed backlash killed the European Super League

Photo: David Cliff/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The 48-hour rise and fall of the European Super League is the perfect encapsulation of how anti-greed sentiment has changed the rules of capitalism.

Why it matters: The highly-complex structures of capitalism are built from the mostly base motivations of individuals chasing money. That's been condemned and celebrated in equal measure — but has also largely been accepted.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Senate Republicans unveil $568 billion infrastructure counterproposal

Sens. John Barasso and Shelley Moore Capito. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senate Republicans formally rolled out the framework for their $568 billion counterproposal to President Biden's $2.5 trillion infrastructure plan on Thursday.

Why it matters: The package is far narrower than anything congressional Democrats or the White House would agree to, but it serves as a marker for what Republicans want out of a potential bipartisan deal.