Washington Gov.Jay Inslee (D). Photo: Suzi Pratt/WireImage via Getty Images

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D), who said Monday he’s close to making a decision on whether he will launch a 2020 presidential bid, told the HuffPost that the Senate filibuster, which requires 60 votes to pass most bills instead of a majority rule, should be eliminated.

"I do believe that the time for the filibuster has come and gone. It was an artifact of a bygone era that is not in the U.S. Constitution and somehow it got grafted on in this culture of the Senate."

Why it matters: As the 2020 race begins to heat up, progressive proposals like the Green New Deal and Medicare for All are all likely to be dead on arrival in the Senate — even if Democrats manage to take back the majority in 2020.

The big picture: Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who has among the most progressive policy proposals in the current Democratic field, told CBS News last week: "I’m not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster. ... The real issue is that you have in Washington a system which is dominated by wealthy campaign contributors."

  • Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif) told reporters over the weekend that she's "conflicted."
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) told Politico last month it should be "on the table" if Democrats retake the Senate and White House.
  • Sens. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Kristen Gillibrand (D-N.Y.). have expressed concerns about going nuclear.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Pence chief of staff Marc Short tests positive for coronavirus — COVID-19 looms over White House Halloween celebrations.
  2. Health: Fauci says maybe we should mandate masks if people don't wear them — America was sick well before it ever got COVID-19.
  3. World: Polish President Andrzej Duda tests positive for COVID-19.
What Matters 2020

The missed opportunities for 2020 and beyond

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Jason Armond (Los Angeles Times), Noam Galai, Jabin Botsford (The Washington Post), Alex Wong/Getty Images

As the 2020 presidential campaign draws to a close, President Trump and Joe Biden have focused little on some of the most sweeping trends that will outlive the fights of the moment.

Why it matters: Both have engaged on some issues, like climate change and China, on their own terms, and Biden has addressed themes like economic inequality that work to his advantage. But others have gone largely unmentioned — a missed opportunity to address big shifts that are changing the country.

Pence chief of staff Marc Short tests positive for coronavirus

Marc Short with Katie Miller, Vice President Pence's communications director, in March. Photo: Doug Mills/The New York Times via Reuters

Marc Short, Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff, tested positive for the coronavirus Saturday and is quarantining, according to a White House statement.

Why it matters: Short is Pence's closest aide, and was one of the most powerful forces on the White House coronavirus task force.