Jamie Dimon. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase, said Wednesday that he thinks he would beat President Trump in an election, though he doesn't plan on running.

"I think I could beat Trump ... because I'm as tough as he is, I'm smarter than he is. I can't beat the liberal side of the Democratic Party. ... And by the way this wealthy New Yorker actually earned his money, it wasn't a gift from Daddy."

Yes, but: Dimon quickly backtracked on his remarks after making them. In a statement to Bloomberg, Dimon later said his comments prove he "wouldn't make a good politician. I get frustrated because I want all sides to come together to help solve big problems.”

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Updated 1 hour ago - Health

8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

8 states set new highs last week for coronavirus infections recorded in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project (CTP) and state health departments. Montana, West Virginia, and Wyoming surpassed records from the previous week.

Why it matters: Cases and hospitalizations are rising in Michigan, a state that initially fought the pandemic with strict mitigation efforts, alongside states that took less action against the spread of the virus this spring.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump says if Biden's elected, "he'll listen to the scientists"Herd immunity claims by top Trump adviser are "pseudoscience," infectious-disease expert says.
  2. Map: 38 states, D.C. see surge in cases.
  3. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — Fauci says he's "absolutely not" surprised Trump got coronavirus.
  4. Business: Consumer confidence surveys show Americans are getting nervousHow China's economy bounced back from coronavirus.
  5. Sports: We've entered the era of limited fan attendance.
  6. Education: Why education technology can’t save remote learning.
Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
4 hours ago - Economy & Business

The Fed is starting to question its own policies

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Several officials at the Fed are beginning to worry about asset bubbles and excessive risk-taking as a result of their extraordinary policy interventions, James Politi writes for the Financial Times, citing interviews with multiple Fed presidents and members of the Board of Governors.

Details: Some are now pushing for "tougher financial regulation" as concerns grow that monetary policy is "encouraging behavior detrimental to economic recovery and creating pressure for additional bailouts."