Feb 3, 2018

America's most surprising new pundit

James Comey — the fired FBI director, who has a hotly awaited memoir, "A Higher Loyalty," coming out May 1 — uses his Twitter feed to lob some of the most biting, terse commentary on White House handling of the Russia probe:

@Comey
  • Above, you see Comey's hot take on The Memo.
  • The day before, when the FBI warned of "grave concerns" about the memo's release: "All should appreciate the FBI speaking up. I wish more of our leaders would. But take heart: American history shows that, in the long run, weasels and liars never hold the field, so long as good people stand up. Not a lot of schools or streets named for Joe McCarthy."
  • On New Year's Eve: "Here’s hoping 2018 brings more ethical leadership, focused on the truth and lasting values. Happy New Year, everybody."
  • After attending "Springsteen on Broadway": "'The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.' - Bruce Springsteen tonight, quoting Martin Luther King, Jr."
  • And one of his most noted posts, when Michael Flynn pleaded guilty: "'But justice roll down like waters and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream' Amos 5:24.'"

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