Photo: Jason Kempin/Getty Images for Politicon

Former FBI Director James Comey suggested in a Washington Post op-ed Wednesday that elected officials should uphold their oaths of office by removing President Trump from office.

The big picture: Comey questioned whether members of Congress would be upholding their oaths if they do not take action against Trump for allegedly withholding military aid to Ukraine to pressure its government to investigate his political rivals. Comey specifically singled out Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio), who voted to impeach former President Bill Clinton but has said Trump's actions don't warrant impeachment.

Key excerpts:

  • "If Congress passes a law giving a vulnerable ally hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid desperately needed to fend off a relentless Russia, and the president of the United States uses that money to coerce the desperate ally to provide electoral dirt on his likely opponent, is the president faithfully executing his office? And if the president conditions White House meetings on acquiring the same foreign dirt to help him get reelected? The answers are obvious."
  • "But oaths are sticky things. If, after all the table-banging, the facts show a president, in exercising the core of his powers under the Constitution — the conduct of foreign affairs and the national defense — failed to faithfully execute his office, what then? If the president used the power and money of the United States to coerce a foreign nation into helping him get reelected, what of the promise senators and representatives made?"
  • "If oaths and promises, the bedrock of the rule of law, are to mean anything, the senator [Rob Portman] and his colleagues will need to explain how they square their solemn promises with Trump’s actions."

Go deeper: Jeff Daniels to star in CBS adaptation of James Comey's memoir

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Florida reports another daily record for coronavirus deaths

Nurse practitioner Barbara Corral and a research assistant conduct a COVID-19 vaccination study on August 7 in Hollywood, Florida. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida's health department on Tuesday reported 276 new coronavirus deaths, surpassing the state's record from July 31.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 a.m. ET: 20,126,452 — Total deaths: 737,285 — Total recoveries: 12,380,410Map.
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Exclusive: Facebook cracks down on political content disguised as local news

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Facebook is rolling out a new policy that will prevent U.S. news publishers with "direct, meaningful ties" to political groups from claiming the news exemption within its political ads authorization process, executives tell Axios.

Why it matters: Since the 2016 election, reporters and researchers have uncovered over 1,200 instances in which political groups use websites disguised as local news outlets to push their point of view to Americans.