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Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.) said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that the "defund the police" slogan has the potential to lose public support for Black Lives Matter and other movements on the left.

Driving the news: Democrats are considering how to move forward after they did not see the gains they expected in the House in the elections. Rep. Abigail Spanberger (D-Va.) told colleagues on a caucus call the slogan hurt the party's electoral chances, per the Washington Post.

  • Clyburn, who as House Majority Whip is the highest-ranking Black member of Congress, has been a leading voice for Democrats on criminal justice and police reform efforts.

What he's saying: Clyburn compared "defund the police" to the "burn baby burn" slogan that became popular during the 1965 Watts riots in Los Angeles, and which Clyburn said lost support for the Student Nonviolence Coordinating Committee, a civil rights group he co-founded with the late Rep. John Lewis.

  • "We can't pick up these things just because it makes a good headline, it sometimes destroys headway. We need to work on what makes headway rather than what makes headlines."

The other side: Black Lives Matter co-founder explains "Defund the police" slogan

Go deeper

Nov 10, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Kevin McCarthy: AOC "runs the floor" for House Democrats

Days after Republicans defied expectations by picking up seats in the House, Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy cited a junior member of Congress — Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y) — as one of the reasons he was able to raise so much money.

Driving the news: "Well, she runs the floor," McCarthy told "Axios on HBO" last night when asked why Republicans respond so vociferously to AOC.

Nov 11, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Jaime Harrison says he'd consider DNC chair if offered the role

South Carolina Democrat Jaime Harrison addresses supporters during a drive-in October rally in North Charleston, South Carolina. Photo: Cameron Pollack/Getty Images

Jaime Harrison is interested in chairing the Democratic National Committee and House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) has "confidence" that he can do the role, the South Carolina Democrat told the Washington Post Tuesday.

Why it matters: DNC Chair Tom Perez isn't expected to stay on in the role, and a committee rep noted he said several times previously he'd serve only one term. Clyburn is an influential figure and key ally of President-elect Joe Biden, who can pick a replacement.

Updated 20 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Sen. Kelly Loeffler to return to campaign trail after 2nd negative test

Sen. Kelly Loeffler addresses supporters during a rally on Thursday. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Sen. Kelly Loeffler's (R-Ga.) campaign announced Monday that she "looks forward to getting back out on the campaign trail" after testing negative for COVID-19 for a second time, following earlier conflicting results.

Why it matters: Loeffler has been campaigning at events ahead of a Jan. 5 runoff in elections that'll decide which party holds the Senate majority. Vice President Mike Pence was with her on Friday.