Dec 17, 2019

Intel acquires Israel-based Habana Labs for $2 billion

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Intel (Nasdaq: INTC) paid around $2 billion to acquire Habana Labs, an AI processor startup based in Israel.

Why it matters: Intel continues buying big to succeed in the AI chip market, which it expects to be worth more than $25 billion by 2024, even if some past acquisitions haven't yet worked out as planned.

  • ROI: Habana had raised $120 million over two rounds of VC funding, from Intel, Bessemer Venture Partners, Samsung, Walden International, and WRV Partners.

The bottom line: "The microprocessor giant is hell-bent on getting internet giants and enterprises to use its neural-network math coprocessors, rather than GPUs and specialist custom parts from Nvidia and others, and it's hoping this Habana upstart will help that dream come true." — Katyanna Quach, The Register

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White House pushes light-touch regulation for AI

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The White House is warning federal agencies against over-regulating artificial intelligence as part of fresh guidance on how to govern the next-generation technology.

Driving the news: The Trump administration's 10 regulatory principles are guidelines for agencies that may be tasked with crafting AI regulations, as well as a signal to companies that the White House is wary of saddling the burgeoning tech with expansive rules.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020

The venture capital party is not over

SoftBank chairman and CEO Masayoshi Son. Photo: Alessandro Di Ciommo/NurPhoto via Getty Images

"The venture capital party is over" was the gist of countless mainstream and social media predictions in October, following WeWork's IPO collapse and SoftBank's difficulties in raising over $100 billion for its second Vision Fund.

Why it matters: They were wrong.

Go deeperArrowDec 17, 2019

AI's health care hype

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Two new studies highlight artificial intelligence's potential to improve patient care, specifically by aiding or improving cancer detection.

Why it matters: AI could create enormous benefits for patients and the doctors who treat them, but some experts warn that the explosion of new health technology could put some patients in danger, as the L.A. Times and Kaiser Health News recently reported.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020