Intel CEO Brian Krzanich. Photo: Asa Mathat for Vox Media

After spending $15 billion on Mobileye and unwinding efforts in wearables and other gadgets, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich says he is ready to take a break from making big changes at the chip giant. "I think you can only take on so much at a time and you need to stop and breathe and let the organization breathe and re-form," Krzanich said in a brief interview after his appearance at TechCrunch Disrupt yesterday.

Despite giving up on a few projects, Krzanich said Intel's biggest bets are paying off. "Our Altera investment has been great," he said, referring to another of Intel's 11-figure deals.

That said, Krzanich doesn't see another similar-size deal anytime soon "I don't see a big gap right now," he said. "It's all about execution and getting some of this done and out the door. ... Make sure you execute on what you said you were going to do. ... It doesn't mean we won't do small things. But I don't have another big one."

On leaving Trump's manufacturing council: "My story there was really more about, look, I am the CEO of a tech company and one of the largest manufacturers in the U.S. If I can help raise U.S. manufacturing and U.S. technology, I am all in. If it starts to become a political argument, that's not my job and not my expertise and I am going to back away."

Go deeper

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.

Facebook goes after Apple

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is seeking to force a face-off with Apple over its 30% in-app purchase commission fee, which Facebook suggests hurts small businesses struggling to get by during the pandemic.

The big picture: Facebook has never publicly gone after Apple, a key strategic partner, this aggressively. Both companies face antitrust scrutiny, which in Apple's case has centered on the very fee structure Facebook is now attacking.

2 hours ago - World

Exclusive: UAE wants Israel normalization finalized "as soon as possible," minister says

The UAE's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Anwar Gargash, told me in an exclusive interview that his country wants to implement its normalization deal with Israel “as soon as possible."

What he's saying: Gargash said he was confident that the U.S.-brokered deal moved Israeli annexation of the West Bank off the table for a “long time.” He also said Israeli tourists would soon be able to travel to the UAE.