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Instagram co-founder shares one thing he does every day

Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP

Here's a quick weekend breakfast conversation with one of the world's most interesting and consequential people. Our debut guest is Kevin Systrom, CEO and co-founder of Instagram — 700 million people, connected by the power of visual communication:

1. What is the one thing you won't skip – or shorten – in the morning? An hour-long workout on my bike.

2. What's your favorite trick for getting smart quickly? Read voraciously, but intelligently. In Mortimer Adler's "How to Read a Book," he says you should not read every page in a book, and spend most of your time figuring out the most important parts to read.

3. What's your favorite life hack? If you don't want to do something, make a deal with yourself to do at least five minutes of it. After five minutes, you'll end up doing the whole thing.

4. What's the one thing you are insecure about? My inability to understand the term "business casual."

5. Name one item on your bucket list. One day, I'd like to ride in the Paris-Roubaix, a road race in northern France. It's one of cycling's oldest races and boasts some of the roughest terrain. I have some training to do!

6. What tech gadget or app saves you the most time? That's easy – Waze! Bay area traffic can be trite, but I use Waze every day to avoid sitting on the 101.

Mike Allen 7 hours ago
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A huge clue about Mueller's endgame

Robert Mueller testifies before Congress in 2013. Photo: Saul Loeb / AFP / Getty Images

Axios has learned that special counsel Robert Mueller has focused on events since the election — not during the campaign — in his conversations with President Trump's lawyers. The top two topics that Mueller has expressed interest in so far: the firings of FBI director James Comey and national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Why it matters: That suggests a focus on obstruction of justice while in office, rather than collusion with Russia during the campaign. But both sagas are interwoven with Russia: Trump himself has linked Comey's firing to Russia, and Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about conversations with the Russian ambassador during the transition.

Amy Harder 8 hours ago
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Column / Harder Line

The swamp’s tug-o-war over America’s ethanol mandate

American eagle with corn in its claws
Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

A biofuels standard Congress passed more than a decade ago in the name of rural development, energy security and climate change has devolved into an arcane fight over market share that has nothing to do with those initial three goals.

Why it matters: The law — called the renewable fuel standard that requires refineries to blend biofuels into gasoline — is a textbook example of how regulations create winners, losers and unintended consequences.