Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Diptendu Dutta/AFP via Getty Images

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's popularity has surged amid the coronavirus pandemic, and he and the Bharatiya Janata Party could emerge even stronger after the coronavirus crisis, per recent opinion polls cited by The New York Times.

Why it matters: If India continues to successfully tackle the pandemic, Modi has the potential to emerge as a more powerful leader. Looking forward, he may try to push more Hindu-centric policies as "the deadly pandemic is bringing many Indians to his side despite lingering concerns about his agenda," the Times writes.

And those policies could come at the expense of Muslims in the country.

  • "The political opposition is practically invisible."

The big picture: Other world leaders have experienced a boost associated with the coronavirus, though for many, that is not anticipated to last.

Meanwhile, analysts told the Times that Modi's uptick in popularity could endure, as many citizens see him as a stabilizer.

  • Some polls show Modi's already-high approval rating jumping to 80%, and even as high as 90% in some cases.

But, but, but: Modi has run into a few bumps during the nation's COVID-19 lockdown, particularly with migrant laborers. Many are newly unemployed or fled India's major cities to return home on sometimes fatal journeys.

  • Economists also believe Modi's $260 billion relief package won't be enough to cover the job and economic losses caused by the pandemic, the Times notes.

What to watch: India is preparing to reopen its economy in the week ahead after Modi implemented one of the word's strongest lockdowns. That move will provide more insight into the economic impacts of the virus.

  • With the reopening, India could also see an increase in positive cases.
  • The country currently has 86,595 confirmed cases.

Go deeper: History's largest lockdown leaves Indian workers stranded, afraid

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
10 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden to sign major climate orders, setting up clash with oil industry

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Biden will sign new executive actions today that provide the clearest signs yet of his climate plans — and will begin an intense battle with the oil industry.

Driving the news: One move will freeze issuance of new oil-and-gas leases on public lands and waters "to the extent possible," per a White House summary.

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
4 hours ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.