Impossible Foods is dramatically expanding its Bay Area presence Monday with 111 Burger King restaurants in the greater San Francisco Bay Area beginning to offer a Whopper using the meat alternative.

The big picture: It's part of a rolling introduction of the Impossible Whopper as the Redwood City, Calif.-based company aims to expand to Burger Kings nationwide by the end of the year, without leaving its current restaurant customers short.

  • "It's great progress," Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told Axios, but quickly added: "We’re a tiny, tiny fraction of the way on our mission. We have to double in size every year for the next 15 years to achieve our mission."

Why it matters: Impossible Foods and rivals like Beyond Meat have managed to generate interest and demand for plant-based meat alternatives. Now they have to show they can satisfy those customers, in all senses of the word.

What's next: The company still hopes to have its first retail products in grocery stores by the end of this year, provided it can meet demand from Burger King and its other restaurant customers.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Media prepares to fact check debates in real time

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

From live blogs to video chyrons and tweets, media companies are introducing new ways to fact check the presidential debates in real time this year.

Between the lines: The debates themselves are likely to leave less room for live fact-checking from moderators than a traditional news interview would.

Life after Roe v. Wade

The future seems clear to both parties: The Supreme Court will overturn Roe v. Wade in the next few years, either gradually or in one fell swoop, and the abortion wars will move to a state-by-state battle over freedom and restrictions. 

What's new: Two of the leading activists on opposite sides of the abortion debate outlined for “Axios on HBO” the next frontiers in a post-Roe v. Wade world as the balance on the Supreme Court prepares to shift.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Jerome Powell, Trump's re-election MVP

Photo illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios. Getty Images photos: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP and Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket

President Trump trails Joe Biden in most polls, has generally lower approval ratings and is behind in trust on most issues. Yet polls consistently give him an edge on the economy, which remains a top priority among voters.

Why it matters: If Trump wins re-election, it will largely be because Americans see him as the force rallying a still-strong U.S. economy, a narrative girded by skyrocketing stock prices and consistently climbing U.S. home values — but the man behind booming U.S. asset prices is really Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell.