Pics from the Clinton (upper left) and Nixon impeachments

This is a not normal presidency, so expect a not normal impeachment process when the House impeachment public hearings kick off tomorrow.

The big picture: "There are consistencies in the process — televised hearings, partisan rancor and memorable speeches — but each impeachment process also stands alone," the AP reports in a useful "then and now" preview.

Investigations:

  • The Clinton and Nixon hearings featured evidence from special prosecutors and followed extensive law enforcement investigations.
  • The Trump hearings feature the House Intelligence Committee assembling its case in the absence of a special prosecutor or Justice Department investigation.

Hearings:

  • The Nixon hearings featured Senate hearings that included the famous question, "What did the president know and when did he know it?
  • For the Trump hearings, expect the fireworks in the House, where Democrats run the show. Plenty of witnesses have already gone behind closed doors, with the public rounds starting tomorrow.

Partisanship:

  • Nixon resigned in the face of likely Senate conviction, and multiple Senate Republicans told him conviction was coming.
  • For Trump, not a single House Republican voted yes on the proxy vote for an impeachment inquiry, and it's hard to fathom Senate Republicans voting to convict.

Cooperation:

  • Clinton apologized for his actions, and Nixon complied with a Supreme Court order to turn over evidence.
  • Trump has called the Ukraine call that launched the inquiry "perfect," and his administration has refused to cooperate with the inquiry.

Go deeper: GOP to argue Trump's "state of mind" on impeachment

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 19,189,737 — Total deaths: 716,669 — Total recoveries — 11,610,192Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 4,917,050 — Total deaths: 160,702 — Total recoveries: 1,598,624 — Total tests: 59,652,675Map.
  3. Politics: White House recommends Trump issue executive orders on coronavirus aid.
  4. Education: Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning.
  5. Public health: Surgeon general urges flu shots to prevent "double whammy" with coronavirus.
  6. World: Africa records over 1 million coronavirus cases — Gates Foundation puts $150 million behind coronavirus vaccine production.

White House recommends Trump issue executive orders on coronavirus aid

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin (L) and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speak to the media on Capitol Hill. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images.

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said President Trump should sign executive orders unilaterally addressing coronavirus stimulus spending after negotiations with congressional Democrats stalled again on Friday.

Why it matters: Friday was viewed as a self-imposed deadline to negotiate a new relief bill. But after an intense week of negotiations on Capitol Hill, White House and Democratic leadership failed to reach a deal on delivering much needed aid to Americans and businesses.

Counterintelligence chief: Russia aiming to “denigrate” Biden ahead of election

William Evanina, director of the National Counterintelligence and Security Center, before Congress in 2018. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

National Counterintelligence and Security Center Director William Evanina said Friday that the Russian government is "using a range of measures" to "denigrate former Vice President Biden" before the November election.

Why it matters: Evanina warned that some Kremlin-linked actors are trying to support President Trump’s candidacy on social media and Russian television, while others are spreading false claims about corruption to undermine Biden and the Democratic Party.