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Expand chart
Adapted from Pew Research Center; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Far more people around the world would like to see immigration decrease than increase, at least in 27 countries polled by Pew.

By the numbers: Support for increasing immigration ranges from just 2% in Greece and Hungary to 28% in Spain. In the U.S., 29% want immigration reduced, 24% want it increased and 44% want it to stay the same.

  • Japan, which has historically had low levels of immigration but faces a severe demographic crisis, is among the most open to increasing immigration. However, as in Canada and South Korea, a majority favors keeping immigration at current (relatively low) levels.
  • Majorities in 12 countries, meanwhile, want to see immigration reduced. They include Russia, Israel, South Africa, Italy and Sweden.

Driving the news: Representatives of 164 countries gathered in Morocco today to sign the first-ever global migration accord. The pact, which is not legally binding, calls for a more orderly and humane approach.

  • The U.S. was at one point the only holdout, but a number of other countries — including Australia, Austria and Hungary — also declined to sign. Belgium's government did sign up and lost its parliamentary majority in a resulting split in the coalition.

Go deeper

The week the Trump show ended

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Donald Trump was eclipsed in media attention last week by President Biden for the first time since Trump took office, according to viewership data on the internet, on social media and on cable news.

Why it matters: After Trump crowded out nearly every other news figure and topic for five years, momentum of the new administration took hold last week and the former president retreated, partly by choice and partly by being forced off the big platforms.

Pay TV's bleak post-pandemic outlook

Data: eMarketer; Chart: Axios Visuals

The pandemic has taken a huge toll on the Pay-TV industry, and with the near-term future of live sports in question, there are no signs of it getting better in 2021.

Why it matters: The fraught Pay-TV landscape is forcing some smaller, niche cable channels out of business altogether.

2 hours ago - World

Biden sets his sights on China

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/Getty Images  

The new administration's first few moves and statements on China suggest that President Biden may continue some of the Trump era's most assertive policies.

Why it matters: China's severe domestic repression, its dramatic rise as a technological superpower, and its increasingly aggressive actions around the globe mean that the world expects the American president to take action.