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Rep. Rodney Davis. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Rep. Rodney Davis (R-Ill.) announced on Wednesday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Davis, the top Republican on the House Administration Committee, said he has taken precautions against the virus, such as twice-daily temperature checks. He spoke to Republicans about staying safe after Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Tex.) recently tested positive for the virus and spoke out against wearing face masks, Politico notes.

What he's saying: “My staff and I take COVID-19 very seriously. My wife is a nurse and a cancer survivor, which puts her in an at-risk category like so many Americans. My office and I have always followed and will continue to follow CDC guidelines, use social distancing, and wear masks or face coverings when social distancing cannot be maintained.

  • “I will postpone public events our office has planned for the coming days until I receive a negative test. I will continue to serve my constituents virtually from home while I quarantine. Our district offices throughout central and southwestern Illinois remain open for constituents as well.

Go deeper: Pelosi says she will require masks on House floor

Go deeper

Nov 14, 2020 - Health

COVID hits first cruise ship to return to Caribbean since pandemic stalled industry

The Seadream 1 ship docks in Bodo in Norway in August 2020. Photo: Sondre Skjelvik/NTB Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

The first cruiseliner to return to the Caribbean since the coronavirus pandemic shut the industry down was forced to return to its home port of Barbados after passengers tested positive for COVID-19, the ship's owner, SeaDream Yacht Club, said Thursday.

Why it matters: Cruise ships were the sites of some of the most severe coronavirus outbreaks early in the pandemic, before the industry suspended operations in March.

Nov 13, 2020 - Health

New York's daily COVID-19 case count tops 5,000 for first time since April

People wait in line for COVID-19 testing in Brooklyn. Photo: Xinhua/Michael Nagle via Getty Images

New York state’s daily coronavirus case count has surpassed 5,000 for the first time since April.

By the numbers: Gov. Andrew Cuomo tweeted on Friday that of the roughly 203,000 COVID-19 tests taken, 5,401 produced positive results. "Total hospitalizations are at 1,737," and the state saw 24 coronavirus-related deaths, per Cuomo.

Nov 13, 2020 - Health

Oregon and New Mexico enter partial lockdowns

Photo: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty

The governors of Oregon and New Mexico issued two-week, partial lockdowns in their respective states on Friday.

Why it matters: The U.S. has seen a surge in COVID-19 cases over the last few weeks. Though officials have hesitated to reinstate the sweeping measures they enforced during the first wave, states are facing increased pressure as case numbers rise and hospital beds fill.