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Hyundai's EV architecture. Photo courtesy of Hyundai

Hyundai Motor Group says it's developed the in-house technology to thrive in the emerging market for electric vehicles as they prepare to unveil a suite of new models over the next several years.

Driving the news: The company yesterday took the wraps off "E-GMP," the Korean automakers' first dedicated EV platform.

Why it matters: Having an EV-specific platform is important for enabling scale and the ability to build multiple types of EVs using the same manufacturing architecture.

  • "E-GMP reduces complexity through modularization and standardization, allowing rapid and flexible development of products which can be used across most vehicle segments, such as sedans, SUVs and CUVs," Hyundai said.

By the numbers: Hyundai said models built on the platform will have range of over 310 miles and will be able to charge up to 80% within 18 minutes at high-speed charging stations.

  • "High performance models" based on E-GMP will go from zero to 60 miles per hour in around 3.5 seconds, with top speeds of over 160 miles per hour.

What's next: Hyundai plans to introduce 23 new EVs by 2025, with an overall target of selling 1 million by then.

  • The company had announced in August the creation of its Ioniq EV unit, with plans for the first vehicle under the effort, a crossover, to arrive next year.
  • Yesterday, they said from 2021 the E-GMP will underpin a range of fully electric cars, including the Ioniq and Kia Motors' first dedicated EV.

Go deeper: Hyundai, Kia and Genesis' electric futures ride atop the E-GMP platform (CNET)

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Jan 12, 2021 - Economy & Business

Electric bus maker Proterra to go public

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Electric bus company Proterra on Tuesday became the latest EV player to announce it's going public via a merger with a special purpose acquisition company.

Driving the news: The deal with ArcLight Clean Transition Corp. values Proterra at $1.6 billion. Proterra builds buses and also provides battery systems and other products for heavy electric vehicles.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
23 mins ago - Economy & Business

First glimpse of the Biden market

Photo: Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images

Investors made clear what companies they think will be winners and which will be losers in President Joe Biden's economy on Wednesday, selling out of gun makers, pot purveyors, private prison operators and payday lenders, and buying up gambling, gaming, beer stocks and Big Tech.

What happened: Private prison operator CoreCivic and private prison REIT Geo fell by 7.8% and 4.1%, respectively, while marijuana ETF MJ dropped 2% and payday lenders World Acceptance and EZCorp each fell by more than 1%.

Mike Allen, author of AM
55 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden-Harris, Day 1: What mattered most

President Joe Biden and first lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at the North Portico of the White House. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

The Axios experts help you sort significance from symbolism. Here are the six Day 1 actions by President Biden that matter most.

Driving the news: Today, on his first full day, Biden translates his promise of a stronger federal response to the pandemic into action — starting with 10 executive orders and other directives, Caitlin Owens writes.