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A sign for Beijing's bid for the Winter Olympics logo. Photo: Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)

More than 160 human rights groups called on the International Olympic Committee to revoke China's award of the 2022 Winter Olympic Games over the country's human rights abuses, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: The letter represents "the largest coordinated effort" yet against staging the Beijing games, coming amid heightened scrutiny of China's mass detention and repression of Uighur Muslims and other ethnic minorities, according to Reuters.

  • Uighur, Tibetan, Hong Kong and Mongolian rights groups were among the signatories of the letter.

What they're saying: “The IOC must recognise that the Olympic spirit and the reputation of the Olympic Games will suffer further damage if the worsening human rights crisis, across all areas under China’s control, is simply ignored,” groups write in the letter, which was released on Tuesday.

  • The signatories argue that the 2008 Olympics emboldened the Chinese government to continue its human rights abuses.

The other side: The Chinese foreign ministry rebuked the letter, calling it an attempt to politicize sports.

Go deeper: Senators urge NBC to refuse to air 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Nov 16, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Senators want Facebook to address anti-Muslim speech

Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) Photo: Mandel Ngan-Pool/Getty Images

A group of Democratic senators says Facebook needs to better enforce its hate speech policies on anti-Muslim posts.

Why it matters: Facebook is under pressure from a range of groups and politicians on both the left and right who feel mistreated by the social network.

USAID chief tests positive for coronavirus

An Air Force cargo jet delivers USAID supplies to Russia earlier this year. Photo: Mikhail Metzel/TASS via Getty Images

The acting administrator of the United States Agency for International Development informed senior staff Wednesday he has tested positive for coronavirus, two sources familiar with the call tell Axios.

Why it matters: John Barsa, who staffers say rarely wears a mask in their office, is the latest in a series of senior administration officials to contract the virus. His positive diagnosis comes amid broader turmoil at the agency following the election.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
3 hours ago - Health

COVID-19 shows a bright future for vaccines

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Promising results from COVID-19 vaccine trials offer hope not just that the pandemic could be ended sooner than expected, but that medicine itself may have a powerful new weapon.

Why it matters: Vaccines are, in the words of one expert, "the single most life-saving innovation ever," but progress had slowed in recent years. New gene-based technology that sped the arrival of the COVID vaccine will boost the overall field, and could even extend to mass killers like cancer.