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SOPA Images/Contributor/Getty Images

In a new filing to the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday evening, Huawei argued that a proposed FCC ban on federal subsidies to telecoms using Huawei equipment would cause severe harm to rural providers.

The big picture: The FCC's proposal is not to be confused with last year's defense authorization bill, a recent executive order or a presidential declaration of emergency, each of which either restricted or laid the groundwork for restrictions on Huawei. But Huawei officials told Axios they suspect the FCC filing will be read by all parties that have put the Chinese telecom manufacturer on the defensive.

Details: The ex parte filing presents Huawei as a company looking to compromise, but thwarted by an uncooperative FCC.

  • The filing claims that Huawei has reached out to each commissioner "to learn first-hand and directly address their concerns over the company." All have declined.
  • In the briefing and in talks with Axios, they emphasize that supply chain risks can be managed in a number of ways beyond banning equipment, such as the United Kingdom's approach of reverse engineering equipment to check on security issues. For its part, the U.K. has yet to come up with a backdoor in Huawei equipment, but flagged other security concerns.
  • "We would like to talk to the United States government about risk mitigation that would allow us to do some business in the United States," Andy Purdy, chief security officer of Huawei, told Axios.

The impact: Huawei argues in its filing that rural providers have neither the funding, the time nor the resources to immediately replace its equipment.

  • The profit margins of rural providers are low, and affording more expensive equipment brands is difficult.
  • But, Huawei Vice President of Risk Management and Partner Relations Tim Danks argued to Axios that rural providers swapping out equipment causes a bevy of other problems.
  • As one example, he suggests that harsh conditions in rural markets can limit the timeframe when rural providers can make changes to equipment. "This could take years," said Danks. "One of our customers in Wyoming only has 3 months a year where they have reasonable access to the base stations in order to do any work."

Go deeper

Top economic regulators stressed by vacancies

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The boom times are all around us (from corporate deal sprees to the breakneck rise of cryptocurrency) — and the agencies in charge are stretched thin trying to police it.

Why it matters: Overwhelmed staff and a slew of vacant posts could set back President Biden's big regulatory agenda.

GOP Sen. Chuck Grassley announces run for re-election

Photo: Greg Nash/The Hill/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), the longest-serving Senate Republican, announced on Friday that he's running for re-election in 2022.

Why it matters: The GOP is looking to regain control of both chambers of Congress in the upcoming midterm elections. Several Republicans had urged the 88-year-old senator to run to avoid another retirement after five incumbent senators said they wouldn't seek re-election.

China deems all cryptocurrency transactions illegal

A person walking past China's central bank in Beijing in August 2007. Photo: Teh Eng Koon/AFP via Getty Images

China's central bank declared on Friday that all cryptocurrencies are illegal, banning crypto-related transactions and cryptocurrency mining, according to Reuters.

Why it matters: China's government is now following through with its goal of cracking down on unofficial virtual currencies, which it has said are a financial, social and national security risk and a contributor to global warming.