Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Paul Richards/AFP/Getty Images

John McCain's Arizona Senate seat, which he'd occupied for more than three decades, will remain vacant until after his burial at the U.S. Naval Academy Cemetery in Maryland, an aide to Gov. Doug Ducey told The Arizona Republic.

What's next: Ducey, a Republican, will appoint McCain's successor to serve until a special election in 2020. The winner of that election would complete the remainder of McCain's term, which ends in January 2023.

Who Ducey might choose:

  • Cindy McCain, the late senator’s 64-year-old wife, leads the list of potential successors, per the Republic. She is a philanthropist, a business leader and an advocate against human trafficking — and she has represented McCain at public events in recent months since his cancer diagnosis.
  • Kirk Adams, a former state lawmaker and Ducey’s chief of staff, is also on the Republic's shortlist. Adams ran an unsuccessful bid for Congress in 2012.
  • Other potential choices on their shortlist: Barbara Barrett, the state’s first female gubernatorial candidate; former Sen. Jon Kyl; former Reps. Matt Salmon and John Shadegg; Karrin Taylor Robson, a member of the state Board of Regents; and Eileen Klein, whom Ducey appointed as state treasurer in April.

Flashback: Jean Carnahan was appointed to a Missouri Senate seat in 2001 after her husband, former Missouri Gov. Mel Carnahan, was posthumously elected.

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
7 mins ago - Economy & Business

Tesla's wild rise and European plan

Tesla's market capitalization blew past $500 billion for the first time Tuesday.

Why it matters: It's just a number, but kind of a wild one. Consider, via CNN: "Tesla is now worth more than the combined market value of most of the world's major automakers: Toyota, Volkswagen, GM, Ford, Fiat Chrysler and its merger partner PSA Group."

Dave Lawler, author of World
48 mins ago - World

China's Xi Jinping congratulates Biden on election win

Photo: Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images

Chinese President Xi Jinping sent a message to President-elect Biden on Wednesday to congratulate him on his election victory, according to the Xinhua state news agency.

Why it matters: China's foreign ministry offered Biden a belated, and tentative, congratulations on Nov. 13, but Xi had not personally acknowledged Biden's win. The leaders of Brazil, Mexico and Russia are among the very few leaders still declining to congratulate Biden.

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
2 hours ago - Sports

College basketball is back

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A new season of college basketball begins Wednesday, and the goal is clear: March Madness must be played.

Why it matters: On March 12, 2020, the lights went out on college basketball, depriving teams like Baylor (who won our tournament simulation), Dayton, San Diego State and Florida State of perhaps their best chance to win a national championship.