Uber released its first employee diversity report this week, and while Uber's reputation is particularly strained at the moment, its workforce demographics aren't all that different from those at other tech companies. White and Asian men still dominate the ranks of major tech companies.

Why it matters: Lack of diversity — particularly for women, African American and Latino workers — is a systemic problem that Silicon Valley companies have actively tried to address. Despite these efforts, these firms have made only modest improvements in recruiting these under-represented workers for key technical and management jobs.

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Methodology: Axios used government EEO-1 reports filed by the companies that shows the racial and gender breakdown of their U.S. employees. We used "Professional" employees as a proxy for technical jobs, though the category does include other professions like accountants and lawyers.

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Obama: The rest of us have to live with the consequences of what Trump's done

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Campaigning for Joe Biden at a car rally in Miami on Saturday, Barack Obama railed against President Trump's response to the coronavirus pandemic, saying "the rest of us have to live with the consequences of what he's done."

Driving the news: With less than two weeks before the election, the Biden campaign is drawing on the former president's popularity with Democrats to drive turnout and motivate voters.

Murkowski says she'll vote to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court

Sen. Lisa Murkowski. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said Saturday that she'll vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Monday, despite her opposition to the process that's recently transpired.

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