Rebecca Zisser / Axios

More than 760 million people around the world are hungry, with even more at risk as the planet's population is expected to grow to 9 billion by 2050. At the same time, climate change and related droughts, floods and epidemics of pest and disease are predicted to challenge our ability to reliably and consistently produce food.

Lab grown food, plants bred with molecular tools and a better understanding of the planet's complex ecology hold the promise of solving the world's food challenges. Given all of these tools, what is the best way to tackle the fast-coming problems of hunger and food security? Four scientists weighed in on the challenges and possible solutions.

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Obama: Americans could be "collateral damage" in Trump's war on mail-in voting

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Former President Barack Obama tweeted Friday that everyday Americans could become "collateral damage" if President Trump continues to attempt to slash funding for the U.S. Postal Service as part of his campaign against mail-in voting.

Why it matters: Trump linked his baseless claims that increased mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud on Thursday to the current impasse in coronavirus stimulus negotiations.

Elon Musk is channeling Henry Ford in auto manufacturing

Photo illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios. Photo: Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who has spent more than a decade trying to disrupt the traditional auto industry, is sounding more and more like the man most closely associated with it: Henry Ford.

Why it matters: In his quest to build affordable electric cars for the masses, Musk is starting to embrace many of the ideas pioneered by Ford's founder — things like vertical supply chains and an obsession with manufacturing efficiency. A century ago that approach helped to popularize the American automobile by lowering the cost of the Model T.

GAO finds Chad Wolf, Ken Cuccinelli are ineligible for top DHS roles

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Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf and his acting deputy Ken Cuccinelli are ineligible to be serving in their positions, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) decided in a report released Friday.

Why it matters: While the finding has no immediate power, it could be important evidence in litigation over policies enacted under Wolf and Cuccinelli's leadership, said America's Voice's Ur Jaddou, who served as chief counsel to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) under President Obama.