House Republicans steamroll Obama's last-call regulations

It's the most important under-covered story of the early weeks of the Administration. While President Trump pops off tweets and executive orders, the Republican House has been quietly overturning significant elements of Obama's late presidency.

The 1996 Congressional Review Act (CRA) allows the new Congress and President to overturn agency rules issued after early June 2016. The House GOP has been furiously — or rather, gleefully — employing it. And there's more to come.

Here are the regulations that the Republican House has gutted so far:

This week the House will vote on five more (bringing the total to 13):

  • H.J.Res. 42: "Disapproving the rule submitted by the Department of Labor relating to drug testing of unemployment compensation applicants"
  • H.J.Res. 66: "Disapproving the rule submitted by the Department of Labor relating to savings arrangements established by States for non-governmental employees"
  • H.J.Res. 67: "Disapproving the rule submitted by the Department of Labor relating to savings arrangements established by qualified State political subdivisions for non-governmental employees."
  • H.J.Res. 69: "Providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of the final rule of the Department of the Interior relating to 'Non-Subsistence Take of Wildlife, and Public Participation and Closure Procedures, on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska'."
  • H.J.Res. 43: "Providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of the final rule submitted by Secretary of Health and Human Services relating to compliance with title X requirements by project recipients in selecting subrecipients."

The big one: The most controversial CRA this week will be the last on the list above — H.J. Res. 43 — which overturns an Obama rule that prevents states from barring funds to the abortion-provider Planned Parenthood.

What's next: Watch for the Trump administration to begin signing CRA legislation this week.

What's next

U.S. evacuates personnel as coronavirus death toll climbs

A health worker checks the temperatures of Chinese travelers arriving in Beijing from Wuhan. Photo: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

56 people have died from an outbreak of a coronavirus strain that originated in Wuhan, China, according to the Chinese National Health Commission.

The latest: The U.S. Embassy in Beijing announced plans to evacuate its Wuhan consulate personnel and some private citizens on a limited-capacity charter flight from the city to San Francisco on Tuesday, per AP, which reports that those "at greater risk from coronavirus" would be prioritized over others.

Go deeperArrowJan 20, 2020 - World

Biden maintains nationwide polling lead as Warren support falls

The 2020 Democratic presidential hopefuls. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

The latest ABC News/Washington Post national poll produced by Langer Research Associates has Joe Biden maintaining his lead with Bernie Sanders claiming second.

Why it matters: Nine days before the Iowa caucuses, Elizabeth Warren’s support among polled Democrats has declined from 21% to 11% since an ABC News/WashPost poll in October.

Andrew Yang qualifies for February debates

Elizabeth Warren, Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

The next Democratic debate scheduled for Feb. 7 will fall after the Iowa caucuses, four days before the New Hampshire primary, ABC News reports.

The latest: Andrew Yang on Jan. 26 became the seventh Democrat to qualify for the February debate after polling above 5% in UNH/CNN's New Hampshire survey, his fourth qualifying poll.

Go deeperArrowJan 17, 2020 - Politics