Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

A top House committee is trying to push Silicon Valley companies to the table to craft an elusive legislative compromise on net neutrality. To that end, it's postponed the deadline for CEOs from those companies — Facebook, Amazon, Alphabet and Netflix — to respond to invitations to testify before the committee.

  • Robin Colwell, the top tech and telecom lawyer for the House Energy and Commerce Committee, told eight tech companies and internet providers in an email sent Monday that committee Chairman Greg Walden "has asked us to manage and execute a process that will allow him to quickly determine the current likelihood of forming a broad coalition of support for any particular set of deal terms."
  • "The Chairman has no interest in wasting anyone's time in this process," she said in the email obtained by Axios. "So all we are looking for at this stage is a list of asks."

But wait: Walden has invited several tech CEOs — including Mark Zuckerberg and Jeff Bezos — to testify at a September hearing on the issue. The deadline for them to reply was initially today, but has been put on hold. "The committee has been engaging in productive conversations with all parties and will extend the deadline for response in order to allow for those discussions to continue," said Zach Hunter, the committee's communications director, in an email. The committee also invited execs from internet service providers to testify.

Sound smart: Walden and other Congressional Republicans would gather some momentum in their efforts to legislate net neutrality by getting internet companies firmly on board with their efforts, which already have the backing of ISPs. But it's not yet clear if anything would convince Democrats to get on board with the bill, since they have committed to fighting the FCC's efforts to roll back the current net neutrality rules.

Go deeper

1 hour ago - Health

Boris Johnson announces month-long COVID-19 lockdown in England

Prime Minsiter Boris Johnson. Photo: NurPhoto / Getty Images

A new national lockdown will be imposed in England, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced Saturday, as the number of COVID-19 cases in the country topped 1 million.

Details: Starting Thursday, people in England must stay at home, and bars and restaurants will close, except for takeout and deliveries. All non-essential retail will also be shuttered. Different households will be banned from mixing indoors. International travel, unless for business purposes, will be banned. The new measures will last through at least December 2.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The massive early vote

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Early voting in the 2020 election across the U.S. on Saturday had already reached 65.5% of 2016's total turnout, according to state data compiled by the U.S. Elections Project.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic and its resultant social-distancing measures prompted a massive uptick in both mail-in ballots and early voting nationwide, setting up an unprecedented and potentially tumultuous count in the hours and days after the polls close on Nov. 3.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike — Austria reimposes coronavirus lockdowns amid surge of infections
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  5. States: New York rolls out new testing requirements for visitors.