The House Judiciary Committee announced Monday that it plans to begin contempt proceedings against Attorney General Bill Barr on Wednesday after he failed to produce a full, unredacted copy of the Mueller report to the committee.

The big picture: Barr had until 9 a.m. on Monday morning to comply with a subpoena from the committee. In announcing the decision, House Judiciary Chair Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) said, "The Attorney General’s failure to comply with our subpoena, after extensive accommodation efforts, leaves us no choice but to initiate contempt proceedings in order to enforce the subpoena and access the full, unredacted report."

Read the markup for the contempt proceedings:

Go deeper: Pelosi accuses Barr of committing a crime by lying to Congress

Go deeper

Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases

People celebrate Independence Day by visiting the beach on July 4, 2020 in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Photo: Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Florida reported 15,299 confirmed coronavirus cases on Sunday — a new single-day record for any state, according to its health department.

The big picture: The number smashes both Florida's previous record of 11,458 new cases and New York's record of 11,571 in April, at the peak of its outbreak. It comes just a day after Disney World reopened in Orlando, despite skyrocketing case numbers in Florida in recent weeks.

Pelosi: Trump is "messing with the health of our children" with push to open schools

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' aggressive push to fully reopen schools this fall is "malfeasance and dereliction of duty," accusing the Trump administration of "messing with the health of our children."

Why it matters: Trump has demanded that schools reopen as part of his efforts to juice the economy by allowing parents to return to work, despite caution from health officials that little is known about how the virus impacts children.

Updated 42 mins ago - Health

Betsy DeVos: Schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos told "Fox News Sunday" that public schools that don't reopen in the fall should not get federal funds, and that the money should be redirected to families who can use it to find another option for their children.

Why it matters: The Trump administration is engaged in a full-court press to reopen schools this fall, despite warnings from some public health officials that the coronavirus outbreak is out of control in many states and that it will be difficult for many schools to reopen safely.