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Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee announced Monday that it would "hold the criminal contempt process in abeyance" for Attorney General Bill Barr after reaching a deal with the Justice Department to access underlying documents supporting the Mueller report.

The big picture: The House will still move forward with a resolution on Tuesday that will authorize committee chairs to go to civil court to enforce their subpoenas, per a House Democratic aide. As Politico's Andrew Desiderio notes, it's important to note the difference between "authorizing" and "issuing" a subpoena. House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler will still seek authorization on Tuesday to go to court to enforce his subpoenas, but will hold off on suing now that DOJ is cooperating.

  • Both Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn will be packaged into Tuesday's resolution.
  • Barr had previously rejected a House Judiciary subpoena to turn over the full, unredacted Mueller report, while McGahn has been blocked by the White House from turning over documents related to the committee's obstruction investigation into President Trump.

Statement from House Judiciary Chair Jerry Nadler:

"I am pleased to announce that the Department of Justice has agreed to begin complying with our committee's subpoena by opening Robert Mueller’s most important files to us, providing us with key evidence that the Special Counsel used to assess whether the President and others obstructed justice or were engaged in other misconduct.  The Department will share the first of these documents with us later today.  All members of the Judiciary Committee—Democrats and Republicans alike—will be able to view them.  These documents will allow us to perform our constitutional duties and decide how to respond to the allegations laid out against the President by the Special Counsel.
"Given our conversations with the Department, I will hold the criminal contempt process in abeyance for now.  We have agreed to allow the Department time to demonstrate compliance with this agreement.  If the Department proceeds in good faith and we are able to obtain everything that we need, then there will be no need to take further steps.  If important information is held back, then we will have no choice but to enforce our subpoena in court and consider other remedies.  It is critical that Congress is able to obtain the information we need to do our jobs, ensuring no one is above the law and bringing the American public the transparency they deserve."

Go deeper: The new case for impeachment

Go deeper

Capitol review panel recommends more police, mobile fencing

Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A panel appointed by Congress to review security measures at the Capitol is recommending several changes, including mobile fencing and a bigger Capitol police force, to safeguard the area after a riotous mob breached the building on Jan 6.

Why it matters: Law enforcement officials have warned there could be new plots to attack the area and target lawmakers, including during a speech President Biden is expected to give to a joint session of Congress.

Financial fallout from the Texas deep freeze

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Texas has thawed out after an Arctic freeze last month threw the state into a power crisis. But the financial turmoil from power grid shock is just starting to take shape.

Why it matters: In total, electricity companies are billions of dollars short on the post-storm payments they now owe to the state's grid operator. There's no clear path for how they will pay — something being watched closely across the country as extreme weather events become more common.

U.S. Chamber decides against political ban for Capitol insurrection

A pedestrian passes the U.S. Chamber of Commerce headquarters as it undergoes renovation. Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce revealed Friday it won't withhold political donations from lawmakers who simply voted against certifying the presidential election results and instead decide on a case-by-case basis.

Why it matters: The Chamber is the marquee entity representing businesses and their interests in Washington. Its memo, obtained exclusively by Axios, could set the tone for businesses debating how to handle their candidate and PAC spending following the Jan. 6 Capitol attack.