Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee announced Monday that it would "hold the criminal contempt process in abeyance" for Attorney General Bill Barr after reaching a deal with the Justice Department to access underlying documents supporting the Mueller report.

The big picture: The House will still move forward with a resolution on Tuesday that will authorize committee chairs to go to civil court to enforce their subpoenas, per a House Democratic aide. As Politico's Andrew Desiderio notes, it's important to note the difference between "authorizing" and "issuing" a subpoena. House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler will still seek authorization on Tuesday to go to court to enforce his subpoenas, but will hold off on suing now that DOJ is cooperating.

  • Both Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn will be packaged into Tuesday's resolution.
  • Barr had previously rejected a House Judiciary subpoena to turn over the full, unredacted Mueller report, while McGahn has been blocked by the White House from turning over documents related to the committee's obstruction investigation into President Trump.

Statement from House Judiciary Chair Jerry Nadler:

"I am pleased to announce that the Department of Justice has agreed to begin complying with our committee's subpoena by opening Robert Mueller’s most important files to us, providing us with key evidence that the Special Counsel used to assess whether the President and others obstructed justice or were engaged in other misconduct.  The Department will share the first of these documents with us later today.  All members of the Judiciary Committee—Democrats and Republicans alike—will be able to view them.  These documents will allow us to perform our constitutional duties and decide how to respond to the allegations laid out against the President by the Special Counsel.
"Given our conversations with the Department, I will hold the criminal contempt process in abeyance for now.  We have agreed to allow the Department time to demonstrate compliance with this agreement.  If the Department proceeds in good faith and we are able to obtain everything that we need, then there will be no need to take further steps.  If important information is held back, then we will have no choice but to enforce our subpoena in court and consider other remedies.  It is critical that Congress is able to obtain the information we need to do our jobs, ensuring no one is above the law and bringing the American public the transparency they deserve."

Go deeper: The new case for impeachment

Go deeper

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Texas and Louisiana face fresh flood threat from Tropical Storm Beta

Tropical Storm Beta slowly approaching the Texas coast on Monday. Photo: National Weather Service/Twitter

Tropical Storm Beta was dumping heavy rains over Texas as it churned its way inland overnight, bringing the risk of "life-threatening storm surge" and flooding to parts of the state and Louisiana, the National Hurricane Center said.

What's happening: The slow-moving storm was causing coastal flooding along areas including the bays near Houston and Galveston in Texas Monday, per the National Weather Service. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) made a disaster declaration and Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency Monday.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 31,328,238 — Total deaths: 964,839— Total recoveries: 21,503,496Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 6,857,967 — Total deaths: 199,884 — Total recoveries: 2,615,949 — Total tests: 95,841,281Map.
  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Media: Conservative blogger who spread COVID-19 misinformation worked for Fauci's agency.
  5. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
  6. World: U.K. upgrades COVID alert level as Europe sees worrying rise in infections — "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.

Louisville police declare state of emergency as Breonna Taylor decision looms

A demonstrator holds up a sign of Breonna Taylor during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The Louisville police chief declared in a memo obtained by news outlets a "state of emergency" for the department on Monday to prepare for Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's expected announcement on the Breonna Taylor case.

Of note: Louisville has witnessed more than 115 days of protests over the police killing of Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, with calls for all the officers involved to be charged.

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