(J. Scott Applewhite / AP)

The House of Representatives today sought a three-month extension in a lawsuit it originally brought against the Obama administration "to give more time for the parties to work together toward a resolution," according to a senior GOP aide. The lawsuit questions the legality of Obamacare payments being made to insurers, but is now technically being brought against the Trump administration.

"The House and Department of Justice filed a motion seeking more time to continue efforts to resolve the lawsuit without the court's assistance," a spokesperson for Speaker Paul Ryan's office told me. If the court agrees with the motion, an appeal of an earlier district court decision will remain on hold and the payments will continue to be made. The earlier ruling sided with the House GOP. If the Trump administration drops the case, the payments to insurers will stop.

The payments, called cost-sharing reduction subsidies, are crucial to insurers' decisions on whether they'll participate in the individual market in 2018. The planning process formally begins in May, and insurers have made it clear they need the payments to continue offering coverage through whatever transition the GOP creates away from Obamacare.

The issue: The lawsuit, brought by House Republicans against then-Department of Health and Human Services secretary Sylvia Burwell, says the payments are being made without the approval of Congress, which is unconstitutional. They were written into Obamacare to reduce out-of-pocket costs for low-income people, and the law clearly states insurers must pass along the subsidies to enrollees, regardless of whether they receive the payments from the federal government.

When Barack Obama left office and President Trump took his place, the suit technically became the GOP suing itself. Aides say the question still needs to be answered by the courts, as it is a matter of constitutional authority.

What to look for: How insurers react. Three months gets us into May, which may be too late for them. The prolonged uncertainty could very well be disastrous for exchange participation.

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Trump tightens screws on ByteDance to sell Tiktok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump added more pressure Friday night on China-based TikTok parent ByteDance to exit the U.S., ordering it to divest all assets related to the U.S. operation of TikTok within 90 days.

Between the lines: The order means ByteDance must be wholly disentangled from TikTok in the U.S. by November. Trump had previously ordered TikTok banned if ByteDance hadn't struck a deal within 45 days. The new order likely means ByteDance has just another 45 days after that to fully close the deal, one White House source told Axios.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 21,056,850 — Total deaths: 762,293— Total recoveries: 13,100,902Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m ET: 5,306,215 — Total deaths: 168,334 — Total recoveries: 1,796,309 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health — FDA releases first-ever list of medical supplies in shortage.
  4. States: California passes 600,000 confirmed coronavirus cases.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  7. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.